8 Steps to Survive Anything

8 Steps to Survive Anything


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

You never know when disaster will strike, so you must be prepared for every eventuality. Check out this article for 8 steps to survive anything.

As a young Airman teaching students at the U.S. Air Force Survival School, I was posed a riddle by one of my officer students.  He said to me, “Imagine you are lost in the woods, it’s freezing cold, hypothermia is setting in, and you come across a cabin in the middle of nowhere. You enter the cabin and there is a lantern, fully functional and ready to go.  There is also a wood-burning stove and a stone fireplace with paper and kindling.  What do you light first?”  I replied, “I would light the fireplace.”  A large smile spread across his space and he said, “Nope, you light the match first!”  Then it was my turn to smile and reply, “But sir, we don’t use matches!”  And I also reiterated that as an Air Force Survival Instructor, we NEVER became lost.

It was refreshing to see that the lieutenant was thinking about survival matters and possible scenarios one might encounter. Over the course of nearly two decades, instructing various students all around the world, I encountered many people who had never camped, never hiked, and didn’t know the first thing about what to do in a “survival situation.”  

As a professional instructor, it brought me great satisfaction to see those same people less than two weeks later leave with the confidence to survive on the basic skills they had learned.  The majority of the students that go through the Air Force Survival School MUST have this knowledge to accomplish their mission and continue in their chosen field. This article will be a short introduction to the basics of survival that could save your life.

1. Increase your will to survive

First and foremost is the Will to Survive, W2S.  You can have nearly every tool at your disposal and perish because you gave up, or you can have next to nothing and refuse to die through sheer force of will. As the old adage says, “You can survive three weeks without food, three days without water, three minutes without air, but not three seconds without hope!”  

Nearly everyone has heard tales of incredulous ordeals endured only by the will to survive. Various movies have been made about such topics, such as the soccer team stuck in the Andes or Shackelton’s voyage to the Antarctic.  The will to survive is something that everyone is born with; however, it is an attribute that can be bolstered even more. The mental desire and discipline to live can be hardened to the point where giving up is not an option. Learning new skills, new techniques, and acquiring knowledge are a few ways to help yourself and those you love. W2S is vital to stay alive and to get out of a bad situation intact, just as vital as having a plan to help you accomplish that goal.

2. Take a minute and…S.T.O.P

Your mindset and your willingness to endure hardships will be the basic keys to survival anywhere in the world and in any condition. The will is equally as important as knowledge, equipment, and skills. And you obtain all of these through study and practice. Though it seems counterproductive in a survival situation, one of the first things you must do is: S.T.O.P

Stop!- Literally, stop. Take two seconds to grasp your situation, check yourself medically. Especially check your body because if adrenaline is pumping, you may have been injured without realizing it. Then, check your inventory and get ready for what is to come. Mentally and physically ensure you are ready for the ordeal in store.

Think – Consider your body, mind, equipment, environment, and location in that environment.  Look for potential communication and signaling possibilities. How likely is rescue to arrive and how soon?  Weigh your situation and then…

Organize- Your gear, your body, whatever you have to help improve your situation or whatever you can scrounge from the vehicle, the aircraft or the environment you are in. Take anything you can find because you never know what use you will have for it.  Too often survivors have left behind valuable equipment because they did not want the few extra pounds of weight or because they did not think they would need that particular item.

Plan – Prioritize your needs based on necessity and prepare your next move.  Keep in mind that your plan must be flexible in such a turbulent situation, and it is subject to change. But instead of exerting energy blindly or moving in a random direction, plan what you are going to do next and how you are going to do it.  Having a plan will greatly help you to achieve the ultimate goal of returning home.

3. Acquire basic medical knowledge

The next basic facet of survival is medical.  Whether it be professional medical knowledge, first-aid know-how, or a medical guide, you must know how to deal with physical emergencies as they arise.  Not only should you consider medical to be a reflexive attribute, such as when a cut, scrape or break occurs, but it should also be a proactive attribute.

For instance, in a colder environment, you must ensure that you aren’t succumbing to frostbite. Or in a desert environment, that you aren’t dehydrating and becoming afflicted with heat exhaustion or heat stroke. In a tropical environment, this includes checking that you are using some type of insect repellent or mud if there are no other options. At times you may have to get creative and use what is in the environment. Local plants are some of the best remedies if you know which ones are edible and how to use them. The best medical treatment is prevention!

4. Ensure appropriate clothing for the situation

If you find yourself suddenly thrust into a survival situation with literally only the clothes on your back, clothing will become vital.  In those moments, even something as simple as a pair of gloves or an extra pair of socks could be crucial. I will delve more into personal survival kits (PSK’s) in the future but consider what you carry on your body on a day-to-day basis and assess your survival chances if you were stranded this moment.

In 2005 I was deployed to Djibouti, Africa at Camp Lemonier.  I used to carry a large Camelbak with me as well as various items inside the bag that made up my personal survival kit.  One day a Marine officer jokingly asked me if I went to the bathroom with that thing on, I said, “Yes I do sir.”  I went on to explain that if we had an alert for incoming threats, there would be no time to run back to my office, grab the bag, and get to a bunker. I knew that with what I had inside that bag, I would survive for at least two days before my water ran out. 

5. Find shelter immediately

When it comes to shelter there are two types, Immediate Action, and Long-Term.  An Immediate Action shelter can be anything that aids in protecting you from the elements in a short timeframe.  Examples are caves, tree wells, rock overhangs, etc.  A short-term shelter can also be something that you can make or improve upon but something that takes a small amount of time.  A Long-Term shelter is something that is usually man-made or something that needs a large amount of improvement.  These shelters are generally types that take more than 30 minutes to construct.  Perfect examples are teepees, log cabins, snow caves, igloos, etc.

6. Know how to build and maintain a fire

The old “Survival TV” is a universal favorite, from 2-year-olds to 102-year-olds.  Everyone has fond memories of sitting around a fire. Maybe you were relaxing, making s’mores, telling ghost stories, having a beer, or merely enjoying spending time with friends and family. In modern society, the ability to start a fire has become amazingly simplified. However, when people are thrust into a situation where matches, lighters, newspaper and lighter fluid are not readily available, it becomes a very difficult undertaking. As much as firecraft is a physically protective facet, it is also an important psychological factor in survival.

7. Find sustenance for long-term survival

I saved Sustenance for last because, in my general opinion, if you enter a situation in a relatively normal and healthy state, sustenance can be put on hold for a while.  It will most definitely become a vital part of survival, but if you have even a small water bottle then you can worry about water and food later after more pressing concerns.  With all that said, water and food are the key components of sustenance and both are vital to survival.

Water is, of course, necessary to all life. We need water to survive and to maintain our bodies at a stable 98.6 degrees, especially if we are injured or under extreme duress and/or exertion from intense circumstances. In a survival situation, plain water is the best liquid to ingest. Nothing else will substitute for plain, good old-fashioned, H2O.

Unfortunately, due to our ability to procure food immediately from the grocery store, obtaining filling food in the wild will undoubtedly be a challenge. One of the most difficult things to overcome will be food aversions, such as snacking on bugs or wild animals that we aren’t used to eating.  

If plants are the plentiful foodstuffs, there is the danger of eating poisonous or harmful plants. There are great “universal” plants that anyone can identify and that are usually found anywhere around the world, hence the term universal.  Some classic examples are Cattail, Dandelion, and Bamboo.

8. Attempt contact with civilization

Lastly, consider signaling and communication, because either of those things may be your ticket home. In a separate article, I will discuss navigation because “self-rescue” may be the only option depending on the situation.  However, a cell phone, radio, or emergency beacon could greatly aid you in getting out of a sticky situation.  

If none of those are available, then being able to construct a signal with natural materials or flares may get you rescued. Classic examples include an SOS message stamped in the snow or HELP created from logs. A flag made of cloth attracts attention due to the movement. A signal mirror is invaluable, especially out on the ocean when potential rescue vehicles are miles away.  There are many pieces of equipment you can use and many things you can improvise, but all of these signaling and communication items are meant to help you return home, the number one goal in any survival situation.

Hopefully, you now have a broader understanding of how to make it out of survival situations alive.  These are key components to help you survive any situation, regardless of where you find yourself.  I hope this short introduction has jump-started your journey towards preparation.

Take the first step towards becoming a survival guru today! Do you know any more survival tips and tricks? Please share in the comments section below. 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email





Source link

Milford Wanderer sails the fiord.

What to Expect From Your Milford Sound Cruise


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Whether you’ve arrived into Milford Sound under your own steam via the Milford Track, or ridden the exciting 950m (3100ft) final descent from the Homer Tunnel to sea level by bus, we’re sure you’ll agree it is a magical place. The scale of the granite mountain faces, the flooded glacial valleys, and the mostly untouched forests, are simply breathtaking. Rudyard Kipling described this place as the eighth wonder of the world; it’s easy to see why.

Mitre Peak and its reflection in the still water of the Fiord.
A still day on Milford Sound gives a perfect reflection of Mitre Peak and the surrounding peaks.

So where does the name Milford Sound come from?

Milford Sound has had a bunch of name changes since it was discovered in 1812 by Sealer Captain John Grono, who named it Milford Haven after his home town in Wales. As us Kiwis have become more conscious of conservation, and protecting our Maori culture and influence, Milford Sound became Milford Sound/Piopiotahi in 1998. But wait! There’s more! Milford Sound is actually incorrectly named… A sound is a river valley which has been flooded by the ocean, and just like so much of our dramatic South Island, Milford was formed by glaciers, and so it’s a fiord. This is a popular trivia question, so take note for your New Zealand adventure!

Milford Sound has several permanent waterfalls, including Stirling Falls – more than three times the height of Niagara Falls. And Lady Bowen Falls; a short distance from the wharf area. Seeing as the granite landscape doesn’t absorb a drop of the annual 6,412mm (252in) rainfall, it made sense for Bowen Falls to be used to power the small town of Milford Sound.  It is during the regular periods of rain in Milford when the waterfalls really come alive. Hundreds of new falls cascade down the steep faces of the mountains, and if you catch Milford on a rainy day, why not name your own?

Group of kayaks approach Lady Bowen Falls
A group of Kayakers approach Lady Bowen Falls.

Overnight Cruise on Milford Sound

If you choose to take an overnight cruise on Milford Sound, you’ll be choosing luxury, tranquillity, and stunning natural beauty. You’ll board the ‘Milford Wanderer’ mid afternoon and cruise the 15km (9.3miles) out to the Tasman Sea, passing by Lady Bowen Falls, and getting close enough to Stirling Falls to feel the fresh spray from the Wanderer’s deck. As the afternoon fades into the coloured light of evening the captain will drop anchor in a sheltered cove, where you can go exploring with specialist nature guides, either by kayak or in the vessel’s small craft, until it’s time to climb back on board for your carvery buffet dinner and some stargazing with a glass of New Zealand wine.

Milford Wanderer sails the fiord.
The Milford Wanderer cruises, under sail, on the fiord.

The next morning we suggest emerging from your private cabin in time to watch the sunrise, it should help to clear your head if you really enjoyed the Kiwi wine! Then tuck in to a hearty buffet breakfast. Your captain will once again point the Milford Wanderer in the direction of the Tasman Sea, take this opportunity to do some wildlife spotting: Dolphins of three different species, New Zealand Fur Seals, and Fiordland Crested Penguins can all be seen at the right time of year in the Sound, alongside New Zealand’s vast array of native and introduced bird life. Occasionally, and most recently in 2016, a pod of Sperm Whales made the 15km (9.3miles) trip into Milford from the coast, marine biologists attributed this to the uncharacteristically low levels of rainfall for that time of year, which in turn allowed Phytoplankton to thrive, the whales’ main food source. If you get to see whales on your cruise you’ll be among a very lucky few – don’t forget your camera!

A seal swims amongst kayakers
A New Zealand Fur Seal playing amongst the kayaks.

Finally the Milford Wanderer will return to dock at the wharf, and we’re sure you’ll disembark rejuvenated, full of good food and great memories, to continue your New Zealand adventure.

Highlights of the Overnight Cruise:

  • Full length Milford Sound Cruise.
  • Optional access to a section of the Milford Track (guided).
  • Three course buffet dinner, fully licensed bar, cooked or continental breakfast.
  • Overnight on the Fiord in Harrison Cove.
  • Specialist Nature Guides for duration of the trip.

 Check out our Tui trip, Essence of the South Island, for an itinerary that includes the overnight option.

Day Cruise on Milford Sound

Several of our itineraries involve cruises on Milford Sound, it’s definitely one of the best ways to get out there and do it, to get up close with nature. The day cruise is included in our Weka itinerary, as well as our Kiwi, and Manuka trips.

Several companies operate daytime cruises from Milford Sound wharf, and we always aim to pick the most personal experience for our guests. We like the guys who only allow their vessel to be booked to half capacity, leaving you with plenty of room to chill out, roam around the decks, or visit the open wheel house and have a yarn with the Captain.

The two-hour Milford experience starts with a slow cruise up the left side of the fiord. Your captain will point out hanging forest, permanent waterfalls, and name some of the tallest peaks. The specialist nature guides on board can also help answer your questions about the geology and wildlife.

Once your vessel arrives at the Tasman Sea, the captain will turn her around and head slowly back up the opposite side of the glacial valley. On the return journey they like to point the bow towards Stirling Falls, and give you a chance, if you want, to be drenched by the spray of one of Milford’s highest permanent waterfalls. If there’s rain and wind, keep an eye out for Milford’s waterfalls to nowhere – try and grab a photo of the cascade before the wind blows it away.

A day trip boat points its bow into Stirling Falls.
A day trip boat points its bow into Stirling Falls.

We know that Milford Sound is right up there on many people’s bucket lists, and can be the greatest reason our guests choose to come to New Zealand in the first place. We have put together a list below of our trips that include either the overnight cruise, or the day trip. If you’d rather have a workout whilst you explore Milford, check out our Rimu itinerary for a kayaking option, or read our page on kayaking Milford Sound here.

kayakers taking a break on Milford Sound
Two kayakers enjoy a moment of quiet on Milford Sound.

Whichever you choose, know that the majesty of this place is reserved by its remoteness, and that by making the journey to Milford Sound itself, you are experiencing somewhere special, somewhere truly New Zealand in all its rawness, and somewhere that will stay with you long after you leave.

The Tour du Mont Blanc with Active Adventures
Facts About Machu Picchu To Outsmart Your Tour Guide

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Adding Weight To Lighter Plugs!


How To Add Weight To Your Plug To Cast Farther!

This has always been an issue when using light weight plugs. How to get distance casting if the lure doesn’t have sufficient weight? You can use braid, the smaller diameter line has less air resistance. It helps but it doesn’t solve this problem. With discussion from my fellow angling partner Wayne Choy this is what we brainstormed last year. It only dawned on me yesterday that it’s just something we do but is shareable to help others.

I’m using a luminescent surface plug for this video that i brought in for myself & Wayne. Works day & night. It glows at night & rattles. We found drilling at an 45 degree angle into the lure, not straight down, can increase the weight up to 3x! Why a angle? It allows the bb’s dropped to make more “rattling” , angles the weight towards the lures backend, & you can get more drill holes into a smaller plug this way.

To figure out the correct weight needed just throw your lure into a bucket of water. Then attach lead sinkers to the hook until it barely sinks. This is your threshold weight. I’m gaging this on salt water usage because salt water is more buoyant. So if adding 35g more will make your lure neutral in fresh water it’ll now be more buoyant in salt water.

After the hole is drilled drop your bb’s into it. Use a “paper punched plastic dot” to place on top of the bb’s with enough room for the bb’s to rattle around. Remember to use a drill bit 1 size smaller in diameter of the punched plastic dot (hole punchers come in 2 diameter sizes) for that friction fit. I then use 5200 marine grade sealant to top it of. Then i cap the top with another “cap” & will color it if necessary.

I already hooked some decent fish using this method. For daytime plugging i like to use a Hammer Bomb for my cast assist. At night i use Hammer Bombs “Flashbomb”. Good luck:)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uquFQKVnccQ



Source link

Couples Defense: What You Can Do With Your Partner To Stay Safe

Couples Defense: What You Can Do With Your Partner To Stay Safe


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Forget the chocolate and flowers! What better way to say I love you this Valentine’s Day than to commit to staying safe with your partner.  This Valentine’s Day, we celebrate couples defense as a vital skill everyone should learn.

The world is constantly changing, and in the United States alone there were 3 million preppers in 2013. There isn’t exactly a checkbox to register as a prepper, but the prepping, survivalist and homesteading lifestyles have been on the rise. A decade ago prepping and the survivalist mindset was seen as dramatic and drastic, but in 2018 it’s a common topic. Between the possible threat from other countries, and the equally frightening threat of natural disasters being a prepper makes more and more sense. Even blizzards on the east coast have names now because of their ferocity, being prepared with survival skills to handle natural disasters, or more, is essential, but what can you do to stay safe with a partner?

Planning is part of couples defense

Planning is important when you’re prepping with a partner. Survival is based on strategy and having a solid plan. If you’re together when a situation inevitably happens what’s your plan? Are you staying in place? Moving? What is your game plan if you’re separated when everything goes down? If you’re both at work where are you meeting? Do you both have survival kits in your car just in case? Being prepared and having a solid plan can be the difference between life and death. Make a plan together, ensures both parties know what their side of the plan entails. Together you should figure out if you want to stay at your home or if you want to bug out, plan for both. Agree on a location to meet up again just in case you’re separated when something terrible happens.

Learn how to defend each other

Does your partner know how to defend themselves? Are they skilled at knife throwing or an expert marksman? To defend each other, without one being a burden to the other, you both need to know how to defend each other, and you need to play off each other’s strengths. You can also play off of each other’s strengths when it comes to regular duties, such as purifying water or hunting. Both of you should know hand to hand and long distance techniques to ensure you can keep each other safe in multiple scenarios. Learning a fighting style, or learning how to shoot with your partner, are both tactics that can help you stay safe while also giving you someone with whom you can train. Most importantly though, you need to be sure your partner is on board with the defense plan.

Get in shape and stay in shape

You don’t want to be the person who knows karate but can’t execute the proper moves because you are out of shape. You need to stay in shape while keeping on top of your self-defense game. Make sure you’re in top shape, cardio is essential, in case you need to get out of a dangerous situation fast. Eat right and work out regularly. Being prepared doesn’t mean getting ready and then being sedentary, it means getting ready, and then staying ready. A regular workout regimen, which you can do together, keeps you in shape while giving you a partner to hold you accountable.

Couples defense requires you to be prepared for anything

If something happens, either a natural disaster or something more sinister, you need to be ready. A bug out bag is what a lot of enthusiasts put together and regularly maintain. They have limited supplies of food, water, a way to purify water, medical necessities, along with anything else you may need. The most significant mistake when getting a bug out, or go bag, together is over packing. You’ll need to pack light, remember to play off each other’s strengths. For example, if one of you is faster and stronger, they should carry the heavier objects. You need to stay together and work together. Travel light, only with necessities, such as food, water, a water purifier, a change of socks, feminine hygiene items if one of you is female and perhaps collapsible cookware. As little as possible is what you’re aiming for. Plan out your bug out bags ahead of time, and keep your bags up to date. 

You can also start stockpiling resources such as medical supplies, canned goods, and dehydrated foods. Take a look at emergency response lists; they may have different objects you might be forgetting about. Preparing for survival at home isn’t difficult, you can compile resources regularly, but you should always be prepared to bug out, just in case your home is compromised.

Know basic first aid

If neither of you is a doctor or nurse, learning basic first aid skills together is essential. In a survival situation, a small cut from the wrong piece of wood or metal can make you sicker than any sneeze. Tetanus alone can kill if you’re not up to date on your shots, and you need to be prepared with any medicines either of you may require regularly. Always be sure you’re up to date on your shots, and learn basic first aid together such as how to clean and stitch wounds and stop bleeding. It’d also be wise to stock up on antibiotics and pain relievers or painkillers if you can, you’ll never know when they’ll be helpful. Hopefully, you’ll never need to use the knowledge, but if you need it, then you’ll have it.

Learn the basics together

Worst case scenario your home has been ransacked, and all your gear and materials have been compromised if not stolen. Do you know how to survive without all of your things? Knowing how to find food, purify water, and handle defenses without having all your gear can be the difference between life and death. Always prepare for the worst-case scenario. If you lose or break your water purifier, do you know how to make one? Do you know what part of an animal to eat, and what parts you shouldn’t eat? Do you know how to hunt, kill, skin and prepare that animal? How about how to build an adequate shelter? Knowledge is power, and being ready for the worst case scenario is the best for your survival. Learn the basics together, if you forget how to purify water than your significant other will likely remember.

How will pets fit into your couples defense plan?

If you have pets how do they fit into your plan? Will you abandon them, or take them with you? Taking them with you is hopefully what you’ll choose, and if you do, you’ll need to prep for them too. How are you keeping them safe? Whose job is it to watch them? Are they cats or dogs? What are they eating or drinking? Dogs in a disaster situation are more useful than cats; they help deter people from approaching you keeping you safer. Cats are less helpful, but you should still bring them with you if you can. Plan together about how you’ll handle the pet situation if a disaster strikes.

Use couples defense tactics to prepare for the worst

When you’re planning to survive you need to prepare for the worst. Plan, to either bug out to a secondary location, or stay in your home. Are you bringing your pets or not? Are you physically ready to defend yourself and your things? Do you have all your bug out bags ready and necessary medicine tucked away? There is no such thing as being too prepared when it comes to survival. Preparing for survival alone is a full-time job, but preparing to defend each other with your partner ensures you can focus on your strengths. You can hold each other accountable for different aspects of prepping, and ensure that you’re ready, no matter when disaster strikes.

This Valentines Day promise your loved one that you will work with him/her to prepare a couples defense strategy that will protect you both!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email





Source link

"the best experience I've ever had."

“the best experience I’ve ever had.”


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

A group cheering and waving near Mt Cook.
The crew from Andrea’s ‘Kiwi’ trip celebrating at Braemar Station.

Over the last twenty years or so we’ve been honing our skills in adventure travel. We started with a group of three guests on a trip around New Zealand’s South Island in 1996, and have progressed to taking groups to nine different countries on four different continents. As kiwis we are famous for our hospitality, we love welcoming people, taking care of people, and sharing in experiences with people. When our guests finally arrive in New Zealand, they’ll often pop into our office in Queenstown mid-trip, because like us, friendships are so important to them. We love being able to put a face to the voice we hear on the phone before the trip!

A group poses for a photo at Active Adventures HQ.
A group of Active adventurers meet Lynette and Fiona at Active HQ in Queenstown.

That hospitality, and the sharing of experiences with new visitors to any of the countries we travel in, are the reasons we love doing what we do. And it’s guests like Andrea Rudolph (recently returned from New Zealand adventures) who help us to remember that: ‘Not only was the scenery breathtaking and the tour well run but our fun loving adventurous group made it even more special. Even the experienced travelers in our group felt it was the best tour they had ever been on. It’s been difficult to settle back into my ’normal’ life after such a life-changing experience.’

We find that guests on our adventures, because they always share common interests (adventure being just one!) really buy in to this idea that sharing the experience makes it so much more powerful. The willingness to be honest and open with one another about your life, and your achievements, and even your regrets, adds another dimension to the experience in a way that we find difficult to put in to words.

 

Andrea wrote some lovely comments about her South Island Explorer trip the ‘Kiwi’. On top of that she also took the time to write an awesome poetic review about the trip, here’s some of our favourite bits:

Active Adventures had everything planned

For a ‘better than average’ trip to Kiwi land

Our fearless leaders, Rachel and Koru

In every instance knew what to do

prepped us on schedules and weather every day

And tried hard to make us listen to what they’d say.

 

Koru told myths of Maoris and war

His tales were creative and never a bore

He showed us plants like the silver fern

This land is so varied there’s a lot to learn.

 

The Hector’s dolphins near the beach were rare

They amazed us by doing flips in the air

At the wildlife center we saw kiwis being fed

And heard how they’re kept safe till they’re bred.

 

 Braemar gave us bright stars at night

Sharing toilets and co-ed showers was also a delight

We ran through the hills, and drank lots of wine

Singing old songs and jingles, it was divine.

 

New Zealand is perfect except for the sandflies

Which bite all our legs as they drop from the skies

They even dare follow us into the van

Where we smash them on windows as fast as we can.

 

I tried really hard to write something clever

To celebrate our group and the best trip ever

Though our journey is over and we’re all back home

We can laugh and remember when we read this poem.

So when our guests return home, from adventures in New Zealand, South America, Nepal, or Europe, they return home with a warm fuzzy feeling that never wears off. And it’s that warm fuzzy feeling, and those unforgettable moments that so often lead to our guests travelling with us again: ‘I’ve spent lots of time researching my next trips. I will definitely go on the Iguana trip. and I will definitely keep checking your website for new trips I can take in the next several years.’ And when those guests take the time to write such amazing comments as the ones Andrea sent us, that warm fuzzy feeling is transferred to everyone involved with Active Adventures, and reminds us all why we love this job.

 

Multi-day Hiking in New Zealand’s Backcountry, and 8 Reasons Why You Should Go Guided.
The Tour du Mont Blanc with Active Adventures

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum : Saltwater Fishing Forum: Saltwater Fishing General: BALLOONING BAITS!


How To Ballon Baited Lines From Shore!

On this day the weather report called for high North winds, which rarely occurs. So i got up at 5am (brrrr) and went to Chocolate Beach. This is my preferred testing area to demonstrate fishing techniques. My friend Junior who works at that area told me the fishing has been bad there for weeks but i just needed to demonstrate how i ballon my baits from shore.

For this i used a 13’3″ Daiwa Ballistic Rod with a Shimano Ultegra 10K spinner loaded with 380yd of 50lb Jerry Brown braid. The main reason to balloon out a rig is to get distance from shore to increase your chances of catching fish. Now if you want to drop a bait instead of having it on the surface you can do it 1 of 2 ways-
1) Use a hard sucking candy with a hole in it (like Life Savers), or drill a hole in a cough drop. Then tie a thread through that hole connecting the balloon to your bait rig. Depending on the candy used (Life Savers will be +-15min) it’ll dissolve & drop your bait.
2) Take a couple squares of toilet tissue & repeat. Roll the sheet into a tube & roll it around to connect the balloon to the bait rig. This time repeated jerks of the rod will cause the bait to break away from the balloon.

Be sure not to use more then 3/4 of your spooled line when ballooning. I usually stop when i loose sight of the balloon. My Ultegra 10K has a line retrieval rate of 40.5in per crank. So i counted 236 cranks bringing in my line. That’d 9,558in. That amounts to 797.5ft or 265.5yd. My reel is spooled with 360yd of 50lb Jerry Brown braid.

The larger the balloon is after inflating means it”ll catch the wind easier & travel faster across the surface. In the past i’ve caught huge Hammerhead & Tiger Sharks using this method. Just got to make sure to keep your back to the wind direction. Also this day i made my most unusual hook-up on my 2nd rig that i used to shore cast with. Snagged a useable 12ft Surf Rod with a large casting reel on it. Still soaking the reel but the rod cleaned-up good!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsbrq_wvPtA



Source link

10 Eye-Catching Folding Hunting Knives

10 Eye-Catching Folding Hunting Knives


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Folding hunting knives don’t have to be practical and boring tools—they can be beautiful and still serve their purpose. If you’re looking for exquisite knives, take a peek at our list and you might just fall for these beauties!

10 Folding Hunting Knives For Every Hunter

When hunters choose folding hunting knives, they factor in the knives’ weight, quality, efficiency, and accessibility. These are very important features to look for in folding hunting knives, as you may already know. But these babies don’t just have to be functional—they can be very classy and even fancy as well. Why choose practicality over aesthetics when you can get both? Upgrade your hunting gear with one of the lovely folding hunting knives on this list!

DKC-37 Victorian Damascus Folding Pocket Knife Camel Bone

DKC-37 Camel Bone | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via DKC Knives

This beautiful piece of art from DKC Knives is made of Damascus steel with camel bone inlay. Uniquely engraved and antique-looking, this folding knife is handcrafted by artisans. It comes with a leather sheath, which gives the knife a rustic charm.

Buck Knives’ 110 Folding Hunter Knife

Buck Knives' 110 Folding Hunter Knife | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via slickguns

Buck Knives is famous for producing the top hunting knives in the market—and the 110 Folding Hunter is one of the oldest and most beautiful folding hunting knives they sell. One glance at this knife and it fills you up with nostalgia. This model has a simple and classic design that has remained unchanged for many years.

Open Season Folding Skinner Knife

Open Season Folding Skinner Knife | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via gpknives

Another entry from Buck Knives is the Open Season Folding Skinner Knife. This knife is specifically designed to skin game as cleanly as possible. The blade is made from double-tempered S30V steel, and its handle is crafted from Rosewood Dymondwood.

Cold Steel Voyager XL Vaquero Plain Edge Knife

Cold Steel Voyager XL Vaquero Plain Edge Knife | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via Oso Grande Knife & Tool

If you need to do some heavy chopping, the XL Voyager Vaquero Plain Edge knife is strong enough to do the job. The blade is beautifully contoured just like a cow’s horn, which explains why the knife is named ‘vaquero’. Its grip or handle is secure enough to endure challenging conditions.

Boker Kwaiken Flipper

Boker Kwaiken Flipper | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via gpknives

The Boker Kwaiken Flipper’s simple, slim, and sleek design makes it look very classy. Its blade, crafted from high-quality VG-10 steel, has a satin finish. The handle is made from carbon fiber and it sports a pocket clip on one side.

Kershaw 3810 Dimension Folding Knife

Kershaw 3810 Dimension Folding Knife | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via WayBeyondGone

The Kershaw 3810 Dimension Folding Knife has an interesting modern look. Because of its ‘futuristic’ appeal, it seems like a perfect prop for a sci-fi movie. This heavy-duty folding knife has a very solid feel because of its titanium handle.

SOG AE07 Aegis Folding Knife

SOG AE07 Aegis Folding Knife | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via soonerstateknives

If you fancy a knife which you could use as both a survival and a tactical knife, the SOG AE07 Aegis Folding Knife is the one for you. The blade has a black finish, which gives the knife a combative and serious appeal. This knife is quite easy to use for both right-handers and left-handers since it has ambidextrous features on its grip.

Spartan by Cold Steel

Spartan by Cold Steel | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via The Gear Barrel

Here’s another knife from Cold Steel—the Spartan, which is a heavy-duty outdoor hunting knife. Its handle, reinforced by steel liners, is uniquely designed for easier and more stable grip. The blade, meanwhile, is made from American BD1 Alloy Steel and sports a stonewashed finish.

Opinel N08

Opinel N08 | Folding Hunting Knives For The Outdoor Warrior | Hunter Gear
image via bladebarrelbezel

Opinel Knives’ N08 folding knife has a round, beechwood handle and a carbon steel blade. This knife is easy on the wallet since its price is relatively low compared to the other knives on this list. It is an example of a simple tool, free from elaborate designs, but still serves its purpose.

Ka Bar Bobcat Dozier

Ka Bar Bobcat Dozier | 10 Good-Looking Folding Hunting Knives | Hunter Gear
image via odinsedge

Ka Bar’s take on this folding hunting knife is quite beautiful in its own way. Bob Dozier’s design is more practical than elaborate. The blade detail is plain and supported by a handle made from Zytel.

Watch this video to check out Craig Shipp’s list of the best folding hunting knives:

Each knife on this list is beautiful in its own way. Moreover, every single one of them has a practical purpose for hunting, including other outdoor activities. So, upgrade your hunting gear with one of these beauties!

Is your favorite folding hunting knife on this list? Let us know what you think of this list by writing a comment below!

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Last update on 2018-02-12 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API





Source link

8 Reasons To Go Guided When Overnight Hiking in New Zealand

8 Reasons To Go Guided When Overnight Hiking in New Zealand


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

5 hikers in colourful gear walk a flat track along a valley surrounded by snowcapped hills.
Hiking up Siberia Valley in Mt Aspiring National Park

The team here at Active Adventures are an outdoorsy bunch. Every weekend you’ll find a handful of us out there in the hills, or on the rivers, getting stuck in to New Zealand in all its natural beauty. One of our favourite ways to spend a long weekend is by grabbing a backpack, packing a toothbrush, a cooker, a few meals, and a sleeping bag, and heading for one of the 950 huts dotted all over the country. Here we’ll talk about spending time in the backcountry on overnight ‘missions’ and offer some advice on how best to tackle the great New Zealand outdoors!

A backcountry hut sits in a basin next to a large alpine lake.
Angelus Hut on the edge of Lake Angelus in Nelson Lakes National Park

Background on New Zealand’s backcountry

As kiwis, we are lucky enough to have some of the best walking in the world, in our backyards. New Zealand has hundreds of trails, amongst vast mountains, rainforests, coastline, glacial valleys, and volcanoes. Even better than that, is that those trails, and (most of) the 950 huts that serve them, are maintained by the Department of Conservation, DoC. The huts started appearing in the 1800s, and were initially a network of shelters for hunters overnighting in the hills. Today they’ve become a big contributor to tourism in New Zealand, and a part of our national identity. For us the most unique thing about hiking in New Zealand is the variety of landscapes you can immerse yourself in. That’s why we love getting out there, because every time (and every hut!) is different.

A person lays back above a glacial valley enjoying the view.
Taking a moment for reflection on the stunning Milford Track

Few people who think of New Zealand do so without thinking of Milford Sound. It’s one of the things that put this country on the map, we don’t deny it. And it is absolutely stunning in its scale, and its untouched nature. The Milford Track is one of New Zealand’s nine Great Walks – walks of stunning natural beauty, maintained by DoC, and taking in the most impressive scenery in the country. But the Great Walks are not the only walks worth doing when you get here! There are quite literally hundreds of multiday walks here, and between us, we’ve probably knocked off most of them!

Learn More About Multiday Hikes

Why are we so addicted to getting out there?

We’d describe our love for multiday adventures in the hills as natural, and an essential part of growing up, and living in New Zealand. Being able to get away from traffic noise, light pollution, even cell reception, in a matter of minutes from home, is a special privilege, and not one we waste. There’s something primitive about arriving at a hut under your own steam, after a tough day, and being greeted by a log fire, smiles, and a cosy bunk. When you’re in a backcountry hut, sharing the experience, and stories, with others, you’re living in the moment; the last thing you’ll worry about is work, or bills. Instead you’ll be worrying about who’s taking up the most boot space around the fire, or who’s next in line at the sink to wash their dishes. It’s a special experience, and it’s made special, in part, by the sense of achievement, but so much more than this by those you share it with.

Two pairs of boots dry on a fence at the head of a valley.
Hiking Boots drying out at Siberia Hut in Mt Aspiring National Park.

And guess what! Aside from the warm fuzzy feeling that multiday hiking gives you, there’s also a whole heap of health benefits, and not all of them are physical! Maybe that’s why people say us kiwis are such a friendly bunch?!

Benefits of going guided

Over the years our guides have learned a few tricks when it comes to overnight hiking. And we know how valuable local knowledge is. When you’re on the trail you’ll want all sorts of information about the area you’re hiking in, its history, the plants, birds, even the elevation changes for each day – your guides can share that with you. And that kind of knowledge adds so much to an experience in the backcountry. They’ll also share a few secrets to having a successful trip, the kind of things you didn’t know you needed to know, or to pack. They’ll take you to the best viewpoints for the perfect photo, and tell you how to make your own pillow – no need to pack one. All you have to do is turn your sleeping bag stuff bag inside out, and fill it with your spare clothes. Now you can rest easy!

A group of hikers and their guide stand on a ridgeline.
Guide Andy, and his group of adventurers on Robert’s Ridge in Nelson Lakes National Park.

Our guides have comprehensive training in all sorts of areas, some of which we hope they’ll never need. They’re trained in outdoor first aid, efficient radio communications, and river crossing techniques, to name a few. And they’re also backed up by an awesome Operations Team here at Active HQ. The team is always just a phone call away, anytime day or night.

Two hikers on the trail, a river running beside, and a small aircraft flying overhead.
To hike in Siberia Valley you’ll need to catch a plane in!

Everyone’s number one priority in the outdoors is safety, especially on multiday hikes. Because of its separation from other large land masses, New Zealand gets some very interesting weather. Add that to the geography of the country, and particularly the South Island, with the Southern Alps dictating weather patterns as they do, and we end up with very changeable conditions. Our local guides have spent their lives amongst those conditions, and are always prepared for four seasons in one day. They’ll approach every hike with a plan A, a plan B, and often a plan C. Rivers can change course, or rise rapidly, groups can be super keen and want to hike further, or struggling, and need to do less, or rest more often. A guide is ready for anything, they’ve seen it all before, they’ll react calmly, and smoothly, and ensure you’re comfortable and safe.

Panoramic shot of glacial lake, icebergs floating, and a group sitting on the shore.
Icebergs floating in Crucible Lake in Mt Aspiring National Park. The kind of place you wouldn’t know to visit without a guide!

Our guides are also logistical magicians, and they work in pairs. You’ll hop off the bus for a hike from A, and the bus will pick you up at B just as you arrive off the trail, or back at civilisation from the hills. They’ll also give you some advice on the best way to ensure you get a comfy bed when you arrive at each hut – if it’s not pre booked. Your guides will carry the little extras, like bug repellent, hand sanitizer, and candles too. They’ve spent heaps of time in the hills, they know exactly what you need for a perfect trip. And to top it all off, they’re masters of the backcountry cooker! You’ll be fed delicious, nutritious meals after a day’s hiking, and wake up ready to go again.

 Why go guided recap

  1. Knowledge of flora, fauna, mountains, rivers, and viewpoints.
  2. Tricks of the trade e.g how to pack your bag, or make a pillow.
  3. Comprehensive safety training.
  4. Backed up by an Operations Team.
  5. Experience of the conditions – plan Bs+Cs in place.
  6. Logistics – arranging transport, organising beds, putting up tents.
  7. Providing the small things that are easily forgotten – bug repellent, hand sanitizer etc.
  8. Excellent cooks.

We’d advise…

So if you’re itching to head out into the hills, and see what the real New Zealand is all about, we reckon your best bet is to do so with a local guide. The best advice we can give you though, is to embrace the whole experience, trust in your guides, and keep in mind that it’s sharing these experiences that makes them special. Head for the hills willing to share your space, and your stories, because it’s the story that you’ll remember long after you’ve taken your boots off.

Check Out Our Guided Trips

Other relevant information:

Preparing for a Hiking Adventure: 8 Fitness Tips for the 50+ Explorer
“For me, this was the best experience I’ve ever had.”

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum How To Cast Plugs At Night From Shore!


How To Cast Plugs At Night FromThe Shoreline!

When i go out at night it can be dangerous. Besides not seeing what you’re doing i also don’t want to get stabbed by my hooks to watching my footing on slippery boulders to transversing lava flows. I try to limit what i’m actually carrying & will pre-fabricate everything ahead of time from leaders to lures.

So when i go plug popping i use my smaller lighter lures. I use a universal monofilament leadering system for all my loose plugs to make it easier & safer. And i try to stay away from trebles, i tend to favor single & trailer assist hooks. Why? Try to fight fish at night with sharp trebles to releasing those thrashing fish without stabbing yourself. Not fun. I use trebles for my larger lures & i pinch the barbs in to make them barbless. You may hook fish easier using trebles but with 2 sets of singles the lures “pop” nicer & the fish you C&R have less hook damage.

I use Hammer Bombs as my cast assist delivery. You can use lead heavy to surface “leadless” to glowing & flashing balls for nocturnal use. And as the name implies they can take a hammer blow & still function. I’ll show how i combine the Hammer Bombs to my lures for easy swapping, even at night. I use a AO Insulated Backpack & a fanny pack for my gear, food, ice & personals. My hands only hold my fishing rod (if i use my rod holder on my fanny pack belt i don’t even need my hands).

This system WORKS. If you’re casting plugs, grubs, or baits it’s a proven way to cast at night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quBBKUKet0I



Source link

25 Ways to Get Clean Drinking Water in an Emergency

25 Ways to Get Clean Drinking Water in an Emergency


If you love the outdoors or you have gone on a trip in the wilderness you know how fast you could gulp down a bottle of water. It can be the intense heat of the sun beating down on you or you’re sweating profusely from all the rigorous activities that your body has been through. What if you run out of water in the middle of nowhere? You may come across a body of water but you’re not too sure about it being clean unless you’re an extreme survivalist. You wouldn’t want to end up with diarrhea or stomach problems, would you? Whether you’re outdoors or at home, being able to get clean drinking water in an emergency is vital to quench your thirst and survive.

The following list will show you’re a number of ways to get clean drinking water should you find yourself in a pinch.

  • Rainwater

    – This can be the most basic substitute next to having a direct source of potable drinking water. You can collect them in rain barrels attached to the downspouts from your roof. The need for straining, filtering and purifying is still needed prior to consumption.

  • Hot Seat

    – The tank of your toilet seat that has a removable lid, more often than not, can be a good source of drinkable clean water. Since it comes directly from your tap then it may be good to drink. However, that would depend on the age of your toilet.

  • Water Heater Tanks

    – You will not have to boil the water taken from these tanks as it has already done that for you. Just make sure you turn off the gas or electricity before unplugging the drain at the bottom of the tank.

  • The SODIS Way

    –  SODIS or solar ultraviolet water disinfection utilizes solar energy(UV-radiation) to purify water to rid it from diarrhea-causing pathogens and other harmful microorganisms. All you need is a clear water bottle or a plastic water bag, sunlight and a short waiting time.

  • Boiling It in a Pot

    – Pour the water through a coffee filter or a piece of cloth to rid it of visible debris and dirt. Heat up the water until it starts to boil. If you have a thermometer it is best that the water temperature reaches a boiling point of 212° F or 100° C to kill all pathogens.

  • Soil/Sand Filter

    – Without the latest technology water filters, one has to go back to the basics. Using a clean empty container, place a shirt or piece of cloth over it then fill it with sand or soil which will act as your filter. Other than removing sediments and particles, there is no assurance on the presence of bacteria.

  • Use a Solar Still

    – Just by digging a 3 feet deep hole into a ground, and using a wide plastic container you’ll be good to go. It may take some time but if you really don’t have any other option then waiting for your drink can be far off better than ingesting potentially harmful water.

  • Evaporation Distillation Method

    – You can even turn salt water into drinking water through different methods. It may require a bit more energy and more complex tools. However, it may be worth the wait especially if you’re located near the beach or floating aimlessly on a boat in the ocean.

  • Filtrating Through Moss

    – Moss absorbs moisture and can give you a quick sip if water can’t be found anywhere else. The web-like structure of moss also helps sift visible dirt and debris. But this doesn’t ensure the that the water you take out of moss is 100% purified.

  • DIY Pocket Water Filter

    – A small tube-like piece of material like bamboo can be used as your base. Fill it with moss, then charcoal, then moss again in respective order. Top it with the top end of a plastic bottle sealed with pine pitch will give you an instant water filter.

  • A DIY Water Filter

    – With the use of ordinary day to day items such as a  gallon bucket and a little bit of patience you can have your own filtration system when out in the wild. Adding bleach or chlorine will give you safe drinking water to end your hydration worries.

  • Purify a la Pool Shock

    – Also known as Calcium Hypochlorite which can be a substitute for bleach in purifying water. It has a very long shelf life, occupies very little space for storage, very cheap and most of all is readily available almost everywhere.

  • Fire It Up System

    – With the use of 2 metals drum, a sheet of metal sheet and a fire you can get distilled water for drinking. Place a fire at the bottom of the drum with bad water then arrange the metal sheet in a curve-like manner in an angle where it will drip steam into the catch drum.

  • Bleach Your Way Out Of It

    – You can disinfect a gallon of water with just 16 drops of chlorine bleach or a quarter with just 4 drops. This does not substitute the boiling method though. Don’t forget to filter the water from sediments and debris.

  • Through Hydrogen Peroxide Purification

    – This household ingredient has that capacity to purify water like that of chlorine and bleach. You will have to treat the water with twice the amount than that of chlorine or bleach. Shake or stir then let it sit for half an hour. There should be a slight peroxide odor after that. Otherwise, it may not have done a significant purification effect.

  • Iodine Tablets

    – Filtering the water from sediments is still needed since all that these little wonders can do is purify your water. 1 small tablet can purify up to a liter of water. Drop it in, give it a little shake and let it stand for 30 minutes before drinking.

  • Potassium Permanganate Purification

    – KMNO4 or more commonly called Condy’s crystals is a water softener that is sold in pill or powder form. 1g or 3 to 4 crystals can purify a liter of water.

  • Combo System

    – A combination of all the basic ways to get clean water would ensure it is indeed safe to drink. Filtering, distilling, chlorinating/disinfecting water from different water sources will give you peace of mind that you’re drinking safe water.

  • Hydration Backpack System

    – You can fill the Geigerrig pack with water taken from lakes, rivers, creeks, and streams to name a few and then attach the filter. You’ll be drinking clean drinking water even on the go in no time.

  • The Berkey Light Purification Device

    – This lightweight, shatter-resistant purifier needs no electricity and is capable of filtering 4 to 8 gallons of the murkiest water. Getting clean water has never been this safe because it’s more than “just another water filter…”

  • Sucking It Up System

    – You will have to embrace the suck on this one as you will surely be sucking it up since your life will surely depend on it. All it takes for you is to pop, dip and suck then you’re good to go. This little compact tool is called the Lifestraw and it weighs only about 2 oz. you will not have to worry about a worry about bringing a bottle anymore.

  • SteriPEN It

    – This revolutionary handheld water purifier is tested and certified by the WQA against US EPA Microbiological Water Purifier Standard. It uses UV light to make your water safe to drink. You will have to filter the water from dirt and debris though as it just sterilizes your water.

  • Sweetwater Purifier System

    – With an easy-to-use lever action pump handle that can provide 1 Liter of drinkable water per minute. This system weighs only 14 oz. and can be easily stored and pack in your bag.

  • Katadyn Water Filtration System

    – This mini filter can produce one to two quarts per minute depending on the mode applied. Depending on the quality of the water source the cartridge can give up to 500 gallons of water.

  • DIY Water Storage

    – Preparation for long-term is also a must. Carefully clean containers to be used for water storage, sanitize and label according to date filled, store in a cool dark place and then rotate container every six months to a year.

  • There are a lot of other ways or methods as well as tools and equipment that one can put into good use to get clean drinking water in the event of an emergency. Making sure of the unsure should the situation call for it is the most basic survival tool that any survivalist must utilize.  You are sure to survive longer or even get through an emergency situation if you master the basic techniques above.





    Source link