Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum : Saltwater Fishing Forum: Saltwater Fishing General: BALLOONING BAITS!


How To Ballon Baited Lines From Shore!

On this day the weather report called for high North winds, which rarely occurs. So i got up at 5am (brrrr) and went to Chocolate Beach. This is my preferred testing area to demonstrate fishing techniques. My friend Junior who works at that area told me the fishing has been bad there for weeks but i just needed to demonstrate how i ballon my baits from shore.

For this i used a 13’3″ Daiwa Ballistic Rod with a Shimano Ultegra 10K spinner loaded with 380yd of 50lb Jerry Brown braid. The main reason to balloon out a rig is to get distance from shore to increase your chances of catching fish. Now if you want to drop a bait instead of having it on the surface you can do it 1 of 2 ways-
1) Use a hard sucking candy with a hole in it (like Life Savers), or drill a hole in a cough drop. Then tie a thread through that hole connecting the balloon to your bait rig. Depending on the candy used (Life Savers will be +-15min) it’ll dissolve & drop your bait.
2) Take a couple squares of toilet tissue & repeat. Roll the sheet into a tube & roll it around to connect the balloon to the bait rig. This time repeated jerks of the rod will cause the bait to break away from the balloon.

Be sure not to use more then 3/4 of your spooled line when ballooning. I usually stop when i loose sight of the balloon. My Ultegra 10K has a line retrieval rate of 40.5in per crank. So i counted 236 cranks bringing in my line. That’d 9,558in. That amounts to 797.5ft or 265.5yd. My reel is spooled with 360yd of 50lb Jerry Brown braid.

The larger the balloon is after inflating means it”ll catch the wind easier & travel faster across the surface. In the past i’ve caught huge Hammerhead & Tiger Sharks using this method. Just got to make sure to keep your back to the wind direction. Also this day i made my most unusual hook-up on my 2nd rig that i used to shore cast with. Snagged a useable 12ft Surf Rod with a large casting reel on it. Still soaking the reel but the rod cleaned-up good!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsbrq_wvPtA



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum How To Cast Plugs At Night From Shore!


How To Cast Plugs At Night FromThe Shoreline!

When i go out at night it can be dangerous. Besides not seeing what you’re doing i also don’t want to get stabbed by my hooks to watching my footing on slippery boulders to transversing lava flows. I try to limit what i’m actually carrying & will pre-fabricate everything ahead of time from leaders to lures.

So when i go plug popping i use my smaller lighter lures. I use a universal monofilament leadering system for all my loose plugs to make it easier & safer. And i try to stay away from trebles, i tend to favor single & trailer assist hooks. Why? Try to fight fish at night with sharp trebles to releasing those thrashing fish without stabbing yourself. Not fun. I use trebles for my larger lures & i pinch the barbs in to make them barbless. You may hook fish easier using trebles but with 2 sets of singles the lures “pop” nicer & the fish you C&R have less hook damage.

I use Hammer Bombs as my cast assist delivery. You can use lead heavy to surface “leadless” to glowing & flashing balls for nocturnal use. And as the name implies they can take a hammer blow & still function. I’ll show how i combine the Hammer Bombs to my lures for easy swapping, even at night. I use a AO Insulated Backpack & a fanny pack for my gear, food, ice & personals. My hands only hold my fishing rod (if i use my rod holder on my fanny pack belt i don’t even need my hands).

This system WORKS. If you’re casting plugs, grubs, or baits it’s a proven way to cast at night.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quBBKUKet0I



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Weather isn’t helping, but we’re catching fish anyway!


As 2017 was drawing to a close, I had hoped that the good fishing weather we had over Christmas week would hold steady. But on Saturday, 12/30/17, when I fished with Rich Driscoll, Sr. and Rich Jr., joined by son Jack and his cousin, Sadie, sea conditions changed by about mid-day, and got progressively choppier, as the winds changed direction and picked up speed. We had made it out 22 miles from New Pass, and the group used squid and cut-bait to catch and release nearly forty red grouper shorts, along with a few puffer-fish. They had a couple of good battles with shark also, but never got them boat-side, since they broke the line before that could happen. The family boxed a few food-fish, including three keeper lane snapper, some grunts, and a porgy.

Given the choppy conditions of the previous day, despite NOAA’s predictions for two-to three foot seas offshore, I advised Mark Smith, his two young sons, Harry and Charlie, and his father-in-law, Harry Stevenson, to fish inshore in southern Estero Bay on Sunday morning, 12/31. We fished an incoming tide, and the family had good action on live shrimp. They caught nine keeper black drum to 18 inches and a 16-inch sheepshead. They released a dozen shorter sheepshead, a sand bream, and a 20-inch snook.

Chris Pammer, his ten-year-old son, Jack, and his eleven-year-old brother, Jake, fished a chilly and windy mid-morning inshore trip with me in southern Estero Bay on Thursday, 1/4. We allowed the sun to warm things up a bit before we departed at 10AM, but it remained chilly, thanks to this strong cold-front that is visiting us for a few days. The boys had fun using shrimp to catch twenty sheepshead, including four nice keepers to 16 inches. They also released a 16-inch redfish, and a few small black drum.

Friday morning, 1/5, was another chilly, windy one. Isaac Wengerd treated his eight-year-old son, Henry, and four-year-old son, Gus, to a backwater fishing trip in southern Estero Bay. The boys bundled up, and had fun using live shrimp to catch seventeen sheepshead, including five keepers ranging in size from 13 to 16 inches. They also caught a 16-inch black drum, and they released a 16-inch snook and one mangrove snapper short.

Seas were pretty rough throughout the weekend and first part of the next week. Thursday was finally calm, and long-time customer, Ron Musick, was ready for his first offshore trip of the season, joined by friends, Eddie Alfonso and Richard Arnett. The guys fished in various spots from 18 to 22 miles west of New Pass, using squid and cut-bait. They boxed twenty-five grunts to 14 inches, along with five keeper lane snapper and four porgies. They released a dozen red grouper shorts.

Friday, 1/12, was a windy day, just ahead of another strong cold front headed to our area. With four-foot seas offshore, John Thomas, Matt Smith, Craig Sims and Steve McKey traded in their offshore plans for a morning of fishing in the backwaters of southern Estero Bay, where they used live shrimp to catch a conglomerate of over fifty fish. The guys were in town for a conference, and had no need for keeping fish, so they released all, including about forty sheepshead to 15 inches, nine black drum to 16 inches, and several crevalle jacks.

The photo shown below is of John Thomas with a 16-inch black drum, caught on shrimp in Estero Bay.

It was tough fishing in Estero Bay on Monday, 1/15, with the cold front having sucked the water out of the backwaters, and extreme low tides, even at their highest point. Jack Oberlin and friend, Perry, were not interested in keeping fish, since they were on a short stay at an area hotel, so, we’d planned on a catch-and-release trip. The guys used live shrimp to catch and release fifteen sheepshead to 14 inches, and that was the only species biting, so they didn’t get much variety, but at least got some action!

Another cold front arrived on the heels of the previous one, with high winds and seas accompanying it, as well as some pretty frigid temperatures for SW FL! Lokoks like conditions will normalize for the weekend, so I’m looking forward to a planned offshore trip for Saturday.

The photo shown below is of Mark Huneke with a 36-inch blacktip shark, caught on cut-bait on a recent offshore trip.

You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishingvideos.html



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Cleaning Fish For Frying & Sashimi!


Cleaning Fish For Frying & Sashimi!

Today i got a call from my buddy Dustin Jed. He had to much fish & wanted to know if i wanted some? First time in years that someone offered me fish. Been giving my fish away to friends & family plus the homeless for years. So i went over & Dustin gave me 2 Trevally, 3 Mackerel Scads & slabs of Tuna. Wahoo! Time to fry fish & dine on sashimi logs.

I’m not a cooking kitchen type kinda guy but thought i’d show how i clean my catch. Been awhile since i give most of my kept fish away for years. I tend to leave the skin on the smaller fish so i scale them because i like fried crispy skin, like my chicken. Also helps to keep the fish fresher.

Note that i mostly use my kitchen shears to clean fish over my fillet knife. And i scale my fish with a scaler that catches the scales (also i scale fish outside the house). I only use my fillet knife for larger sized fish. And i use thick freezer bags to store my fish in. If the fish has long sharp spines then you should cut the spines off during cleaning.

Today i was forced to clean fish at home. I really try not to let fresh water touch a exposed fish fillet, rather salt water from the ocean is better. If you just want to fillet the fish then don’t bother scaling it. For smaller species using a good kitchen shears over a fillet knife leads to less painful accidents. If a knife is needed please be sure it’s sharp.

And lastly instead of buying ice i use used frozen water bottles. I re-fill the bottle slightly less then the original level was which allows the expanding ice more room to solidify without busting the bottle. Cheap alternative to buying ice. I then add salt water when i have fish to create a brine that is much colder then the ice itself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJGcv8dLu0c



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Spoprt fishing Topshotfishing Happy Day Today Sailfish


Fort Lauderdale Fishing with Top Shot Sportfishing Charter Boat and Capt. Zsak

Felipe Lahersseai and sons Felipe, Mikel, Manuel, Ricardo and Luis chartered the Top Shot Sportfishing charter boat team to do some, deep-sea charter boat sport fishing in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Conditions for the day were cloudy skies with the wind direction out of the east and the seas were 3 to 5 feet with temperatures in the mid 70’s.

We started out the morning trolling in 150 ft. of water with four surface Ballyhoo baits and two deep plainer lines fishing the reef area. We trolled up and down the reef from deeper waters into shallower waters, trying to find fish going over rock structures, reef and wreck structures. I made a turn offshore north of Fort Lauderdale and went out to deeper waters, hoping to find indicators that fish were around, such as birds, floating boards or a weed line. While heading offshore, I spotted a few birds diving, so I trolled our baits over to that spot, As soon as we passed the birds, two lines came down, and we had double header Mahi Mahi’s on the line. The boys grabbed the rods and started fighting the Mahi Mahi’s. The Mahi’s fought hard, pulling drag out and swimming back and forth, jumping and sounding. The boys did a good job and brought the Mahi’s to the back of the transom, where our mate, Marc, gaffed the fish and put them in the fish box.

We went back to trolling and continued searching the area. I headed towards even deeper waters, got out to 500 feet and found a rip line. While working the rip lines, I saw a school of flying fish get out of the water. Two of our rigger lines came down, and two Sailfish were on. Both of the Sailfish jumped out of the water showing their magnificent colors and tail-walking. One of the Sailfish came off the hook, but we still had the other one on. Luis was the angler, and did a great job, fighting the Sailfish. He managed to bring the Sailfish along the side of the boat for picture taking, and the Sailfish was released to fight another day. We went back to trolling the area and worked the rip line for the remainder of the trip with no more bites.

It was now time to head back to the dock. The anglers retired into the a/c salon and enjoyed the relaxing trip back to the dock at Bahia Bar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd. Fort Lauderdale 33316.

For a successful and adventurous deep sea fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale FL for Sailfish, Shark, Bonito, Mackerel, Swordfish, Snapper, Wahoo, Tuna, Mahi Mahi and Grouper, contact Captain Zsak. – 954-309-7457 or email us at tzsak@bellsouth.net Website: www.topshotfishing.com.



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Fishing Fort Lauderdale Topshotfishing Happy Day Todat Sail/Shark


Fort Lauderdale Fishing with Top Shot Sportfishing Charter Boat and Capt. Zsak

The Sam and Lorraine Evans and their son, Ben, were having a family vacation celebrating Ben graduating from college. They decided to make fishing a part of their celebration, so they chartered the Top Shot Sportfishing charter boat team to do some deep-sea charter boat sport fishing in Fort Lauderdale, FL.

We started out the morning catching live bait, and headed towards the sea bouy in Fort Lauderdale in 120 ft. of water, 1.8 miles from shore. We put out small jigs and caught eight Bullet Bonitos. Next, we hooked the baits up to a wire rig with a single #6 hook and slow trolled the baits, which is another good live-bait method.
The first strike we had ate the bait fish in half and got away. This happened a second time where only the head came back and the bait was ripped in half. We continued slow trolling the Bullet Bonito in 150 feet of water south of Fort Lauderdale. A Shark fin popped up behind the right rigger bait – he ate the bait, and we had this five-foot Shark on for a few minutes, but he got away. We re-rigged and went back to fishing – this happened a second time only the Shark fin was bigger. A seven foot Hammerhead Shark ate the live bait, and the fight was on. First thing we did was clear the lines and then started backing down on the Shark. When you have a big fish with light tackle, it is always best to get as much line back on the reel and help out the angler. After about twenty minutes of fighting, the Shark popped up very close to the boat. Mark, our mate, grabbed the leader line making this an official caught fish. The Shark was not done fighting, though, and sounded for another forty-five minutes. The Shark came up a second time, pictures were taken, and the Shark was released to fight another day.
Next, we decided to try some trolling and put out four surface baits, which were Ballyhoos, and one deep plainer line. I worked the area back and forth looking for signs of life, whether live bait, birds or rip currents, but did not find any, so we decided to go back to live Bullet Bonito slow-trolling fishing. Marc cleared out the trolling spread and put the live baits back out. I started pulling the baits up the reef line, and a nice twenty pound Kingfish ate the bait and jumped out of the water, shook his head and got away. I continued working up to the north of Fort Lauderdale with a second opportunity on a Kingfish, and this time we caught him. We next decided to troll the Ballyhoo over the reef. After an hour, we finally got a bite on the left Ballyhoo rigger bait, and ended up catching a Sailfish. After a great fight, we got the Sailfish in the boat, removed the hooks, took a couple of quick photos, and released the Sailfish.
It was now time to head back to the dock. The anglers retired into the a/c salon and enjoyed the relaxing trip back to the dock at Bahia Bar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd. Fort Lauderdale 33316.

For a successful and adventurous deep sea fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale FL for Sailfish, Shark, Bonito, Mackerel, Swordfish, Snapper, Wahoo, Tuna, Mahi Mahi and Grouper, contact Captain Zsak. – 954-309-7457 or email us at tzsak@bellsouth.net Website: www.topshotfishing.com.



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Battling winds and tides, but catches are good!


After a few days of cold temperatures, high winds, and rough seas, causing me to cancel a couple of trips, Saturday, 1/20/18, was finally calm enough to get offshore. I fished in spots from 18 to 28 miles west of New Pass with Joe Hahn and his friends, Bob, Mike, David, and George. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release a bluefish, twenty-some red grouper shorts to 18 inches, as well as five sharks, consisting of four blacktips and one sharpnose, all of which were around the 40-inch mark. We also had a huge shark (variety unknown) grab a piece of cut-bait, run, and break off, exploding the water around us. As for dinner, the guys boxed eighteen keeper lane snapper.

Monday morning, 1/22, I fished 22 miles west of New Pass with Frank Dwyer and his son-in-law, Ryan. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release twenty-six red grouper shorts, and to cull ten keeper lane snapper to 13 inches, along with a half-dozen 13 to 14-inch grunts.

Tuesday morning, 1/23, I headed out in a light drizzle with Drew VanWerden and his two young sons. Seas were calm, and we headed out 22 miles, but the rain persisted, at one point turning into a heavy shower. We had enough wet-weather gear to keep us dry, and the boys didn’t mind fishing in the rain and in the fog that followed. They used squid and cut-bait to catch and release a 17-inch cobia, twenty-one red grouper shorts to 18 inches, and lots of grunts to 12 inches. The lane snapper were biting well, and the guys caught twenty-seven keeper lanes to 13-inches.

Winds picked up ahead of another cool front moving into the area, and that produced some choppy sea conditions on Wednesday, 1/24. But, long-time customers and hardy father-son anglers Larry and Chris Baumgartner weren’t intimidated! They fished 22 miles west of New Pass with me in a stiff 20-to-25 knot wind most of the morning, and used squid and cut-bait to catch a variety of fish. They lost one big grouper that swam to the bottom and cut the line, and they released red grouper shorts, an 18-inch gag grouper, and a 14-inch scamp grouper. They also caught five mangrove snapper, three of which were keepers ranging 13 inches to 15 inches. They caught over twenty grunts, and boxed a few of the largest of those, along with four porgies in the 13-to-14-inch range.

Frequent customer Mike Connealy and his son, Clint, had to trade their offshore plans for some inshore, catch-and-release fishing on a very windy Friday morning, 1/26. There were small craft advisories offshore, and even the bay presented some challenges in a relentless wind of about 25 knots. The guys used live shrimp to catch and release thirteen sheepshead to 13 inches, two crevalle jacks that were each about 12 inches, and a 15-inch black drum.

Winds persisted through the weekend. I fished inshore in southern Estero Bay on Sunday, 1/28, with Stan and Jean Dzedzy and their son and daughter-in-law, Dave and Debbie. The family used live shrimp to catch three keeper sand bream, a 15-inch drum, a 17-inch drum, and a 17-inch pompano. They released fifteen sheepshead shorts and two mangrove snapper shorts. The photo shown is of Dave Dzedzy with a 17-inch pompano, caught on shrimp on his inshore trip 1/28/18.

Monday, 1/29, I awoke to light rain and fog, with another cold front expected to arrive over-night and into Tuesday. Seas were choppy first thing in the morning, and it remained misty after the fog lifted, but seas calmed a little by mid-morning. I began fishing at the near-shore reefs with Lee Larsens and his friends, Carey, Jerry, and Rick, but there was very little action there. So, as seas calmed down a bit, we ventured out further to about fifteen miles offshore. Fishing was tough everywhere, and I can’t recall the last time I saw such slow action at several of my typically productive spots. The guys used squid and cut-bait to catch and release two whitings, a few blue runners, one red grouper short, and a few grunts.

With small craft advisories issued for Tuesday, 1/30, and predictions for seas of four-to-six feet, I canceled my planned offshore trip, which had already been rescheduled from the previous week’s rough weather!

By Thursday, 2/1, seas were finally calm enough to get out about 23 miles west of New Pass, where I fished with frequent customers, Ron Musick, Richard Arnett, and Eddie Alfonso. There were tons of little bait fish everywhere, and lots of undersized fish biting, but the guys were able to box some food-fish, consisting of three keeper lane snapper, a 13-inch mangrove snapper, two porgies, and a few nice-sized grunts. They released twenty-plus red grouper shorts and four mangrove snapper shorts. Everything bit on squid and cut-bait.

Friday morning, 2/2, seas were calm when I fished a catch-and-release trip 19 miles west of New Pass with William Connors, Mike Connors, and friends Dan, Mark, and Pat. The guys used squid and cut bait to catch and release twenty-four red grouper shorts, a mess of grunts, and mangrove snapper to 16 inches. The photo shown is of Mike Connors with a 16-inch mangrove snapper, caught on squid on his offshore trip 2/2/18.

Winds picked up on Saturday, 2/3, and we were back to choppy seas offshore, with a small craft advisory issued. So, Roman Jahnke and his dad, Tom, who were treating Roman’s son, Roarke, to a fishing trip for his tenth birthday, traded offshore plans for some inshore fishing on the flats of southern Estero Bay. The family used live shrimp to catch five keeper black drum to 16 inches, and they released ten sheepshead shorts, a crevalle jack, and two stingray that were each about three pounds.

You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishing videos.html



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Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges


Video – https://www.youtube.com/…3MCI4ox00s&t=23s

In this episode me and my buddy started a trek to go after some massive fish that were running under a bridge in our local area. The night was a cold on but we toughed it out and made the most out of a rare, cold, epic Florida night. Hope you guys all enjoy! New video coming next week!

Hope everyone has an awesome day. Tight lines guys!



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Fishing Tips For Anyone Starting Out With The Sport

Fishing Tips For Anyone Starting Out With The Sport

Although there are a variety of hobbies, fishing can quickly become one of your most enjoyable ones. This hobby can be fun for the whole family, from grandkids to grandma. Being successful at fishing requires both the proper equipment as well as the knowledge of how to use it. If you are not sure where to begin, read on.

Try casting close to shore if your fishing trip takes you to a river or lake. This is because fish will find insects in these locations. So to increase your opportunities for success, try fishing along the bank. Don’t catch the weeds, though!

Grubs are a great bait for catching bass. These little insects will help you land some large fish. They are useful in catching small and largemouth bass. They work extremely well for catching fish in highland reservoirs that do not have much brush or other coverage.

Always know what the local regulations are about fishing when you head out on the water. You might not be able to use certain bait within some areas, while other laws might prohibit fishing in certain bodies of water. If you don’t know, have a talk with local government officials.

Plumper live bait is much more appealing to fish; it also is easier to place on your fishing hook. Allow the bait to fatten up overnight before your fishing trip. Put your worms into a container lined with newspaper and then place it in the refrigerator overnight. The cold and moisture will cause them to retract their bodies and appear larger.

Improved clinch knots are great for placing lures or hooks onto the line. Just like threading a needle, you will slip the tip of the line through the eye of the hook. Proceed by looping the line around itself 5 times before securing it by passing it through the eye again and into the first loop. To complete the knot, pull the end around the loop very tightly.

Always take a look at the weather forecast before heading out on a fishing trip. Because weather is unpredictable, make sure you check the forecast before going on your fishing trip. This is the best way to avoid dangerous situations or being stuck somewhere because the weather is too bad to drive home. So, it is a safe precaution to read a weather forecast prior to heading out on any fishing expedition.

Try avoiding windy areas when fly fishing. When you are fishing in the wind, it becomes very difficult to have an accurate cast. Dawn and dusk are the best times to fish as the wind is typically low. If you are having problems with the wind, try positioning yourself with the wind, rather than against it or at your side.

Small-mouth bass and walleye may be rather picky when it comes to bait. In addition to your normal live bait, include some leeches. Leeches can be kept alive overnight by putting them into a plastic or Styrofoam container that is ventilated and has water in the bottom.

Nice weather can change the quality and mood of your fishing trip drastically. Before fishing, check out the weather predictions. Check a week before your trip, and then check again the night before. If the weather isn’t going to be good, consider rescheduling your trip.

When you have hooked a big fish and it is trying to get away, do not panic. Don’t waste energy reeling in a fleeing fish. Sit back and let your reel’s drag do the work for you. When the fish is hooked, set your drag. Orient your rod at an angle of about 45 degrees relative to the water, and point your rod at the fish.

Never panic no matter how big the fish you’ve caught! Large fish can put up a fight; don’t reel them in immediately or you risk your rod breaking. Set your drag, then wait it out. When the fish exhausts itself, you can reel it in.

Children thrive on praise. Never ridicule their catch even if, by your standards, it is less than worthy of their efforts. While making a big catch may be easy for an adult, a young child may have a harder time of it.

If you are targeting larger sized fish, it’s important to used larger sized bait. It’s fairly simple. A larger fish likes a larger bait and vice versa. To catch larger varieties of fish, like Pike or Muskie, consider using Blugill or Crappie bait.

Know where the fish are. When you are consistently going to a specific location, you should know where the bass are biting. Learn what time they seem to be most active during. Timing is extremely important when you are bass fishing.

There is no universal bait that all fish enjoy equally. To catch the fish you want, you will need to know how to use different bait, such as worms, jigs or grub. For instance, the best place to use jigs is in murky water. In this environment, their wobbling is far more likely to grab a fish’s attention. By contrast, it’s best to use plastic worms when the water is not murky, as they are clearly visible to fish without the fisherman jiggling them around.

A large fish isn’t always a trophy. When you go fishing and you catch fish that are much larger and older than others, it is probably a good idea if you return them to the water instead of trying to make them a meal. When a fish is huge, it’s likely that they’ve consumed many contaminants, which doesn’t make it the healthiest of meals.

When fishing in a boat, many people use an instrument called a depth finder. Depth finders help fishers to judge how deep the fish may be swimming according to temperature.

Fishing can be an exciting and relaxing hobby. You can expect to rapidly build up your fishing skills if you follow the suggestions that you have just read through. Schedule an outing with your friends or family members, and start fishing. Chances are good that you will create a memory to cherish for years.

Take A Look At These Fishing Tips!

Take A Look At These Fishing Tips!

 

People who fish are often fond of the taste of fish as well. The best and most delicious fish to eat is often the fish that you catch on your own. You’ll have to go out and catch a few fish if you want to have a nice, fresh fish dinner. But before you do that, you’ll need to get some great fishing advice. Below are some hints on catching fish.

Almost any fisherman can improve his chances by wearing camouflaged clothing. Fish aren’t colorblind. Bright colors can easily spook them. Neutral tones and earth colors are best to blend into your surroundings.

Be sure to wade carefully through water. If you need to go through a river when you are fishing, walk carefully and slowly. Many people do not realize it, but when you move through the water you are at risk of scaring the fish away with the noise. Take your time and be sure you don’t disturb the riverbed.

If you are fishing with a current, cast into the current and let it bring your bait to the desired area. This is more natural looking and increases your odds of catching something. Be careful not to allow a lot of slack line to go into the water.

The birds can be your best fishing partners. Whenever you notice birds swooping into a certain area, it is likely that lots of fish will be in that location. People aren’t the only ones who enjoy fishing–birds are more than willing to dive for their dinner. You may find your fishing success increases dramatically if you fish where the birds congregate.

Take a camera with you when you go fishing to help show off your catch when you choose to return it to the water. This way, you can return the fish to its home, but it will give you something to show everybody back home.

Grubs are a great bait for catching bass. Surprisingly, some small lures can catch enormous fish. They are often used as bait for smallmouth bass but may also catch largemouth bass as well. If you’re in a highland reservoir, they’re perfect.

Always know what the local regulations are about fishing when you head out on the water. There are certain areas that prohibit fishing all together, or there are some areas that might restrict certain bait. If you aren’t sure, talk to the local government office.

A good tip for any fisherman is to get the correct license for your fishing area. In the United States, you need a different fishing license for each state, and you can choose from either a day, or year-long license.

When your big fish is on the hook, swimming like mad to escape, keep your calm. Do not reel in your fish as it tries to swim away. Do your best to relax and let your rod and the drag do the work. Once the fish has been hooked, set your drag. Keep the fishing rod angled at about 45 degrees to the surface of the water, keeping it pointed towards your fish.

Did you know that each phase of the moon have an affect on fishing? Full moons tend to make the best time for night fishing since fish tend to be very active around this time. Just remember that moonlight will also increase your visibility; take the appropriate steps to counteract this.

While fishing with a buddy, it is important that you pull your line from the water whenever he or she snares a fish, and your partner should do likewise if you are catching a fish. Doing so prevents nasty snarls and tangles and makes bringing the fish in much easier.

To be certain your lure lands upon the water silently, you must practice the many techniques used by fishermen for casting. You will want to have as little noise as possible, otherwise, you run the risk of scaring the fish away. Using your wrist when you cast will aid you in this technique.

Temperature and time are crucial factors in catching fish. When it comes to bass, bigger fish usually are out at both dawn and dusk since this is when their bait fish are active. Just be sure that the water is above 50 degrees when you are fishing at these times.

Move around every now and then if you’re having trouble staying patient when fishing. This will enable you to have a fresh mind and you will also be able to enjoy the scenery, as well. You might even find your new favorite spot.

Keep your reel clean and lubricated. Keeping up with this maintenance is important for being able to accomplish the fundamentals of fishing–casting and reeling. A reel that is well lubricated will run smoother, reducing casting time and making the entire process easier. Maintaining your reel properly makes a big difference to your success.

Fishing from a boat can allow you to easily access good fishing spots. However, it also presents added danger. When fishing out of a boat, always think about safety first. Make sure all passengers wear life vests, keep oars on board, and keep tabs on the weather because storms can come up quickly.

Prior to cooking a fish, it is best to scale it. You could use a big spoon or buy a fish scaler. Hold the fish firmly on its side by grasping the head as you scrape. Make sure you are patient. This may take a while, especially when the fish scales are thin.

Make sure your hands are wet before touching a fish. Fish are protected with a slimy layer that helps them stay moist, however dry hands can remove this slime and hurt the fish. Not only will this help keep the fish healthy when released back into the water, it also maintains freshness in those you keep to eat.

Use these tips the next time you go fishing, so that you catch as many fish as you want. Even if your first fishing attempt isn’t a glowing success, don’t give up. It takes a little practice to become a great fisherman. The fish will keep coming back to you if you have the dedication.