Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Cleaning Fish For Frying & Sashimi!


Cleaning Fish For Frying & Sashimi!

Today i got a call from my buddy Dustin Jed. He had to much fish & wanted to know if i wanted some? First time in years that someone offered me fish. Been giving my fish away to friends & family plus the homeless for years. So i went over & Dustin gave me 2 Trevally, 3 Mackerel Scads & slabs of Tuna. Wahoo! Time to fry fish & dine on sashimi logs.

I’m not a cooking kitchen type kinda guy but thought i’d show how i clean my catch. Been awhile since i give most of my kept fish away for years. I tend to leave the skin on the smaller fish so i scale them because i like fried crispy skin, like my chicken. Also helps to keep the fish fresher.

Note that i mostly use my kitchen shears to clean fish over my fillet knife. And i scale my fish with a scaler that catches the scales (also i scale fish outside the house). I only use my fillet knife for larger sized fish. And i use thick freezer bags to store my fish in. If the fish has long sharp spines then you should cut the spines off during cleaning.

Today i was forced to clean fish at home. I really try not to let fresh water touch a exposed fish fillet, rather salt water from the ocean is better. If you just want to fillet the fish then don’t bother scaling it. For smaller species using a good kitchen shears over a fillet knife leads to less painful accidents. If a knife is needed please be sure it’s sharp.

And lastly instead of buying ice i use used frozen water bottles. I re-fill the bottle slightly less then the original level was which allows the expanding ice more room to solidify without busting the bottle. Cheap alternative to buying ice. I then add salt water when i have fish to create a brine that is much colder then the ice itself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJGcv8dLu0c



Source link

6 Adaptogenic Herbs to Relieve Stress in the Wilderness

6 Adaptogenic Herbs to Relieve Stress in the Wilderness


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

When you’re in the wild and encountering a lot of stress or fatigue, you should consider taking adaptogenic herbs. You might find these herbs in nature, and they could very well save your life.

Adaptogenic Herbs: Relieve Stress and Fatigue Naturally

Stress crops up in many situations, not only when you’re out in the wilderness, but also in your everyday life. You can be stressed about your to-do list, or relationships, or issues at work. This is when adaptogens come in. Adaptogens are natural substances known to empower the hormonal response of your body to stress. Adaptogens can be commonly found in the herbs around you.

1. Asian Ginseng

Asian Ginseng | Adaptogenic Herbs You Can Use In The Wild For Survival


Also known as Panax Ginseng, Asian ginseng is used as traditional medicine for ages because of its health benefits. It has antioxidant properties that could help in strengthening and restoration of the immune responses of the body system. However, this is not recommended for pregnant women and children.

2. Eleuthero

Eleuthero is a shrub common in Northeastern Asia. It is known as the “King of the Adaptogens”. Chinese people have traditionally used this as an herbal medicine for muscle spasm, joint pain, and fatigue. It helps the body to adapt to stress and makes the body’s response to stress more effectual. Additionally, eleuthero enhances your memory and keeps you focused when under pressure.

3. Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha is also referred to as Indian Ginseng. It is a shrub that has yellow flowers and circular leaves. This adaptogenic herb strengthens stamina and increases energy. Ashwagandha is also used as an ayurvedic medicine, intensifying the functions of the adrenal and endocrine gland which actively responds to stress.

4. Rosemary

Rosemary | Adaptogenic Herbs You Can Use In The Wild For Survival


Rosemary is a fragrant plant having spike-like leaves and purple flowers. This herb is usually used in cooking. In addition, rosemary also increases the activity of the hormonal responses of the body. It supports some organs of the body like the heart, liver, and most of the digestive system, which can improve one’s mood and boost memory.

5. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera | Adaptogenic Herbs You Can Use In The Wild For Survival


Aloe Vera is traditionally cultivated as a medicinal plant in many countries. Some apply it to their hair for extra shine and smoothness, while others use it to boost their immune system and adrenal health. Another reason why you should consider taking aloe vera is that it increases diffusion of oxygen into the blood stream through the blood cells, relieving stress.

6. Bacopa

Bacopa is a creeping herb common in wetlands. It is known to reduce anxiety and induce memory functions of the brain to keep you sane in the most stressed moments. Additionally, bacopa helps in keeping you focused, thus, reducing stress tendencies.

To learn more about adaptogenic herbs, watch this video:

Adaptogenic herbs contain adaptogens that bring balance to the regulatory functions of the adrenal system which in turn reduce stress and anxiety tendencies of a person. These adaptogens could be added to your daily intake of food. However, it is best to hear advice from medical practitioners, especially for pregnant women and children. You can always ask professionals or research on your own about what adaptogen fits your body’s needs.

What other adaptogenic herbs do you know? Share them in the comments section below!

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email





Source link

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Patagonia

So you like to be active, huh? That’s totally cool with us. In fact, our new tour features the best of the best when it comes to an active vacation—hiking volcanoes and kayaking fiords—and you may just see some really amazing things along the way.

Here’s the perfect itinerary for 14 days in Patagonia for all of the ultimate explorers out there:

 

Day 1: Get your bearings in Bariloche with an authentic Patagonian meal.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

We all know travelling takes a lot out of you. One of the best jet lag cures? Food! And you’re going to love Patagonian cuisine.

Your arrival to Bariloche brings you to the chocolate capital of Argentina. Artisan chocolate shops line the streets, beckoning you inside. And why not? You’re about to spend two weeks on the move—live a little!

Dinner tonight features a typical Patagonian meal. Entrees include beef, spit roast lamb, trout, king crab, and wild boar. Served alongside your meats are potatoes, breads, and cheeses. All of the foods come from the surrounding landscapes, from the glacial rivers (trout) to the dense forests (wild boar) to the Atlantic Ocean (king crab).

 

Day 2: Warm up your hiking legs with a trek to Cerro Llao Llao and cool off with a dip at Playa Tacul.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

It’s your first official day on the trail! And what better way to spend it than amongst the lakes and peaks of Patagonia. Cerro Llao Llao sits in the midst of three different lakes, all of which can be seen from the top of your hike. Popping up in the distance are the tops of Cerro Lopez and Cerro Capilla.

Wind your way through a wooded trail to the top for a mid-morning tea break, a very “Patagonian” thing to do! After finishing your tea (or maybe mate!), descend Cerro Llao Llao to lake-level. Here you can walk the sandy shores of Playa Tacul or even jump into the crystal clear and clean waters of the lake. No matter how you choose to spend your time, you are sure to love the lago (that’s Spanish for lake!).

 

Day 3: Get your heart pumping with a brisk climb to Cerro Bella Vista—you won’t believe the views.

It’s day three in Argentina, and you may be feeling one of two ways: Completely ready for the next adventure or exhausted as your body is still trying to adjust to Patagonian life. The good news is you get to choose how you want to spend your day!

For those ready to hit today’s Patagonian path, head to Cerro Bella, which literally means “beautiful views.” You’re going to want to make sure you have your camera and/or smartphone for this one. Binoculars wouldn’t hurt, either.

It’s quite a trek to the top, with a heart-pumping ascent above the treeline, but it’s well worth it for 360 degree views of the myriad lakes and crowded horizon line of huge peaks.

If you’d rather spend the day exploring Bariloche and its surroundings, that’s completely fine too! Who wouldn’t want to sample the rich and smooth chocolate the town is known for? Or maybe do some souvenir shopping?

 

Day 4: Hike the “Road of the Seven Lakes” to Cerro Falkner and panoramic views of Argentina’s Lake District.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

If you signed up for spectacular sights, today is the day for you. Your journey today takes you through the “Road of the Seven Lakes” to Cerro Falkner. The trail twists and turns through lush forests, by cool-blue lakes, and past wondrous waterfalls. Feel free to take a dip in the water if you’re feeling so inclined!

Soon, the base of Cerro Falkner emerges ahead, and you’re ready to begin your climb to the top. The trees you pass are coihue and ñire, the latter of which is the southernmost tree on earth as it was found on Hoste Island. Once you reach the tip of the mountain, you’ll be happy for every step you took on the way up. Marvel at all seven of the lakes from a bird’s eye view, it’s just amazing.

 

Day 5: Enter the “Ring of Fire” with a trek up the south face of Volcan Lanin.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

If you can’t stop singing a certain Johnny Cash tune right now, no one will blame you. That’s right, we’re headed into the “Ring of Fire.”

Volcan Lanin straddles the border of Argentina and Chile and has two National Parks on its slopes (one for each country). The wild woods of the mountain enhance your hike. Lookout for the peculiar Pehuén, or monkey puzzle tree.

As you encounter the volcano’s snowline, you might think you’ve gone “North of The Wall” as snow exists year-round here. Mountains upon mountains go as far as the eye can see, creating a breathtaking backdrop.

 

Day 6: Immerse yourself in the Chilean rainforest at the Huilo Huilo Reserve.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

After one last Argentine ascent (the red-hued Cerro Colorado), you’re on your way to Chile. Once over the border (that’s another stamp to your passport!), board a ferry on Lago Pirihueico for a ride to Huilo Huilo Reserve.

This private, biological reserve is 600 square kilometers of Chilean temperate rainforest. There’s a high amount of precipitation here and relatively warm temperatures during the summer. Wildlife enthusiasts will be in Patagonian paradise. There are 81 known species of bird throughout the forest as well as the phantom puma — we say phantom because you will most likely never see the big cat due to its timid and nocturnal nature.

Here you’ll never be far from the local flora as your hotel is literally shaped like a mushroom. Reino Fungi Hotel pays architectural homage to the fungi found in the forests near the lodging. Enjoy a house-brewed beer as a nightcap before getting a good night’s rest. Tomorrow has a lot in store!

 

Day 7: Explore the Valdivian forest and waterfalls along the Fuy River.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary
© Marcos Escalier

We won’t have to go too far for our hike today. The Fuy River and Valdivian forest are practically on our doorstep. As you wander through today’s trail you’ll feel as if you’re in a fairytale. Songbirds serenade you from the treetops, and picture perfect waterfalls break up the many tributaries.

While these sights are amazing, you can choose instead to have a relaxing day at the hotel, if you’d prefer. Soak up the sun with lakeside views and a coffee or hot chocolate. Or perhaps you’d rather soak yourself in the lodge’s hot pools. Whatever your fancy, you can’t go wrong at our friendly, fungi inn.

 

Day 8: Raft the Petrohue River past four magnificent volcanoes. [Free day option]

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary
© amira_a

Welcome to Puerto Varas! There are so many options for you to consider today, but no matter which you choose, you’re going to have a blast. It’s a free day in this Chilean town, but that doesn’t mean there is no adventure to be had.

A great way to spend your afternoon is rafting the rapids of Petrohue River. As you navigate through the white and wild waters, be sure to look up at the four vast volcanoes that line the river.

Cyclists will appreciate the opportunity to show off their skills at the Osorno Volcano pump track. And of course, you can always choose to stay within town limits for shopping, sightseeing, and sampling of local cuisine.

 

Day 9: Check out the Chilean fiords and hike Hornopirén National Park.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

On the Chilean coast is the village of Hornopirén, its name derives from the nearby volcano and means “snow oven.” No matter where you look, the views are outstanding. The Andes Mountains are dissected by the Chilean fiords, and glaciers cover their slopes.

Lunch at the local market brings you closer to understanding the Chilean culture. Try a fresh catch of Merluza or Congrio (Southern Hake and Conger Eel) or grab one of the many colorful fruits and vegetables.

Bellies full, it’s time to get inside Hornopirén National Park, renowned for its mountains, glaciers, and volcanoes all packed into a relatively small area. Animal lovers will also love the wide variety of fauna residing in the untouched temperate forest. A ferry ride to Llancahue Island takes you home for the night.

 

Day 10: Soak in the hot springs at Cahuelmo Fiord.

It’s your 10th day in Patagonia. You’ve seen some incredible sights, but you might be feeling in need of a “pick me up.” The hot springs of Cahuelmo Fiord will do just the trick. The springs are located inside Parque Pumalín, created by the late American entrepreneur and ecologist Douglas Tompkins, founder of The North Face.

One of the things that makes this park so unique is the way in which the local economy thrives alongside conservation. Within the park you’ll find small organic farms with activities such as animal husbandry, cheese making, ecotourism, wool handicrafts, and honey production.
Beginning with a short boat ride on Quintupeu Fiord, you’ll see wonderful waterfalls and granite peaks. The azure waters of the fiord are met with the steep, emerald forested walls of the Andes.

Following up the spectacular scenery will be spectacular springs. In the temperate rainforest lies Cahuelmo Fiord, which produces relaxing hot springs just waiting to be lounged in. Let any tension in your body flow out into the warm waters. There’s no better way to end your day than with a reflective soak in the hot springs.

 

Day 11: Kayak where fresh and saltwater meet—and maybe meet some friends along the way.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

Water-lovers will enjoy getting on tandem kayaks on the Reloncavi Fiord. Kayaking is the best way to see the snow-capped mountains, cascading waterfalls, and even certain sea-friends (sea lions and dolphins might just swim by!).

After disembarking from your kayak, lunch will be a special treat at a locally owned farm for an authentic asado (lamb barbecue). Meet the Yolanda family, who have been living on the banks of the fiord for three generations. Chatting with the Yolanda’s will allow you to fully embrace Chilean culture and understand the Andean way of life.

 

Day 12: Test your limits on a trek to Desolation Pass on Osorno Volcano—the views are absolutely worth it.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

Hiking Osorno Volcano takes you through many different kinds of landscapes. First, your trek will begin on a lunar landscape—rocky and desolate of any vegetation. As you climb further up the slopes, lush woods emerge, bringing you back down to earth. Finally, as you ascend to the top (known as Desolation Pass), the stunning skyline comes into view. Below is Lago Todos Los Santos, it’s crystal clear waters reflecting the surrounding sights.

Back at your home-away-from-home for the night is a hearty meal complete with a glass of red wine. If you’re looking for more than a libation to relax, try lounging in the wood-fired hot tubs.

 

Day 13: Take a catamaran cruise across Lagos Todos los Santos before crossing the Andes into Argentina.

It’s your last full day in Patagonia. Take a minute and soak in your surroundings. Got them locked in your memory? Okay, here we go…

Today’s travels begin on Cruce Andino, or the lakes route. Cruise on a catamaran over Lago Todos los Santos towards your lunch in Peulla. Then, it’s time to get back to Argentina, but not before a dramatic crossing over the Andes Mountains.

On the other side are even more lakes just waiting to glide you across their mirror-like surfaces. A boat ride, bus ride, and catamaran cruise later and you’re back at Bariloche, where this journey began.

 

Day 14: Celebrate your Patagonia adventure with a farewell tour of Bariloche.

14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

Before departing the paradise of Patagonia, be sure to get in some last minute activities in Bariloche. Fill up on a festive Argentine feast with your new found friends, before heading to the airport. Do some last minute shopping for souvenirs to take home to loved ones (postcards are great for remembering your favorite sites!). Delight yourself with some delectable desserts in the corner chocolate shops or take one last stroll around the city for beautiful, Swiss-style architecture.

As you board your flight, headed home, reflect on the last two weeks. Maybe you like to journal. Maybe you have a blog of your explorations. Perhaps pictures on your phone are the best way to remember the good times you’ve had. Adios, Argentina! It was fun.

 

Want to get active in Patagonia?

Between the sights, activities, food, and people, you can’t go wrong with an adventure in Patagonia. Click here to start planning the adventure of a lifetime. Or, if you aren’t quite ready to book but would love more information about this tour, sign up for our free email series.

Celebrate Like A Kiwi – Hike New Zealand’s Milford Track this Christmas
7 Surprising Reasons South America Is the Ultimate Winter Destination

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Spoprt fishing Topshotfishing Happy Day Today Sailfish


Fort Lauderdale Fishing with Top Shot Sportfishing Charter Boat and Capt. Zsak

Felipe Lahersseai and sons Felipe, Mikel, Manuel, Ricardo and Luis chartered the Top Shot Sportfishing charter boat team to do some, deep-sea charter boat sport fishing in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Conditions for the day were cloudy skies with the wind direction out of the east and the seas were 3 to 5 feet with temperatures in the mid 70’s.

We started out the morning trolling in 150 ft. of water with four surface Ballyhoo baits and two deep plainer lines fishing the reef area. We trolled up and down the reef from deeper waters into shallower waters, trying to find fish going over rock structures, reef and wreck structures. I made a turn offshore north of Fort Lauderdale and went out to deeper waters, hoping to find indicators that fish were around, such as birds, floating boards or a weed line. While heading offshore, I spotted a few birds diving, so I trolled our baits over to that spot, As soon as we passed the birds, two lines came down, and we had double header Mahi Mahi’s on the line. The boys grabbed the rods and started fighting the Mahi Mahi’s. The Mahi’s fought hard, pulling drag out and swimming back and forth, jumping and sounding. The boys did a good job and brought the Mahi’s to the back of the transom, where our mate, Marc, gaffed the fish and put them in the fish box.

We went back to trolling and continued searching the area. I headed towards even deeper waters, got out to 500 feet and found a rip line. While working the rip lines, I saw a school of flying fish get out of the water. Two of our rigger lines came down, and two Sailfish were on. Both of the Sailfish jumped out of the water showing their magnificent colors and tail-walking. One of the Sailfish came off the hook, but we still had the other one on. Luis was the angler, and did a great job, fighting the Sailfish. He managed to bring the Sailfish along the side of the boat for picture taking, and the Sailfish was released to fight another day. We went back to trolling the area and worked the rip line for the remainder of the trip with no more bites.

It was now time to head back to the dock. The anglers retired into the a/c salon and enjoyed the relaxing trip back to the dock at Bahia Bar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd. Fort Lauderdale 33316.

For a successful and adventurous deep sea fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale FL for Sailfish, Shark, Bonito, Mackerel, Swordfish, Snapper, Wahoo, Tuna, Mahi Mahi and Grouper, contact Captain Zsak. – 954-309-7457 or email us at tzsak@bellsouth.net Website: www.topshotfishing.com.



Source link

How to Make a Hammock in The Rainforest

How to Make a Hammock in The Rainforest


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Knowing how to make a hammock is an important survival skill, whether you’re out there exploring a rainforest or trying to live through a natural disaster. Learn how to make a hammock or at least set up one in this post!

Survival Shelter: How To Make A Hammock

A good ‘ole hammock is your best friend while you’re in the rainforest camping, backpacking, or, in a worst-case scenario, trying to survive a zombie apocalypse. Just hang it on tree trunks and tree top branches and you’ll have a decent survival shelter off ground. Boost your survival skills by learning how to make a hammock or at least set up one. Read on and enjoy!

Setting Up The Hammock

Gear up.

Make sure you have the complete gear before you venture out into the rainforest. To set up a hammock between trees, you would need a static rope, dynamic rope, polyester webbing straps, locking carabiner, throw line, harness, belay device, and of course, a hammock. Take note, these things must be durable enough to support your weight.

Find solid trees.

Scout the area for solid, sturdy trees. Hammocks are ‘traditionally’ hung between two trees, which are around 12 to 15 feet apart. Sometimes, depending on the style of your hammock, you would need three trees. But you can also set your hammock on just one tree if it is solid enough and has strong branches.

Do the climb.

You don’t need to climb a tree if you’re thinking of setting the hammock just a little bit off the ground. But there are risks when you sleep in a rainforest and hanging your hammock on treetops is one way to avoid them. To ascend tall trees properly and safely, you would need to learn some climbing techniques first—like how to rig a tree and how to use the throw line.

Wrap protective straps around the trees.

The trees’ health is affected when you use them to hang your hammock. To lessen friction and prevent any other kind of damage to the trees, you need to wrap their trunk or branches with protective straps. You can even use sticks between the trees’ surface and the straps to avoid further friction.

Attach hammock rope to the straps.

After placing protective straps on the tree’s surface, you can tie or attach the hammock rope to the webbing straps. Sometimes, you only need an S hook to connect the tree straps and the hammock’s ropes. But if you set up your hammock on treetops, you must use strong knots and good quality carabiners to secure the hammock.

Secure the perfect sag.

Secure the perfect sag. | How To Make A Hammock In The Rainforest | Survival Life Tips

Test the hammock and adjust it until you’re comfortable. A 30-degree angle from the hammock rope to the tree is a pretty comfortable sag. When a hammock is hung too tightly, it becomes unstable. You would want to secure a deeper sag to decrease your chances of falling off the hammock.

Add tarp.

Protect yourself from rain, debris, and cold by placing a tarp over your hammock. Just simply add a ridge line by tying a rope on one end of the hammock to the other end. Then you pitch the tarp by hanging it on the ridgeline.

How To Make The Hammock

Use canvas.

Canvas, a very durable fabric, is popularly used to make sails and has also been used by sailors to make hammocks. That’s why hammocks made from canvas are called naval hammocks. Making a naval hammock is not an overly complicated process and would be a relatively easy DIY project.

Use ripstop nylon.

Good quality ripstop nylon is a pretty durable fabric as well and makes a good material to create a hammock. Actually, it has been used to make much of the camping gear sold in stores. What’s great about this fabric is its resistance to tearing. Even if the fabric does get ripped, the tear would not spread easily.

Use ropes or paracords.

Rope hammocks are more suitable for a warmer climate. They take longer to make, especially for beginners. But if you want to channel your creativity in making a hammock, this project would be great for you.

Watch this DD Hammocks video to learn more about hammocks:

If you have spare time, learn how to make a hammock. It’s more than just a DIY project and a hobby. You’re basically cultivating a skill which may come in handy any day during your lifetime.

Do you know how to make a hammock? Is there something you can add to this post? Don’t hesitate to share your thoughts with us by writing a comment below!

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email





Source link

Female hiker walking a New Zealand Great Walk with forested mountains in the background

Celebrate Like A Kiwi – Hike New Zealand’s Milford Track this Christmas


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Female hiker walking a New Zealand Great Walk with forested mountains in the background

Anyone living in the northern hemisphere will be familiar with the term ‘white Christmas’… but have you ever heard of a ‘golden sand Christmas’? Or a ‘lush green rain forest Christmas’? Maybe a ‘glass of wine as you’re sun baking beside a lake, high in the Southern Alps Christmas’? Ok, we’re getting carried away now, but what an amazing idea – a Southern Hemisphere Christmas!

Summer solstice lands on December 22nd in New Zealand this year, so during the Christmas/New Year period our days are the longest, warmest, and it’s the perfect time to be exploring the great Kiwi countryside. This also means it’s the most popular time to visit New Zealand, but I’m here to tell you that the crowds don’t matter – if you choose your trip wisely.

Most Christmas travellers from the Northern Hemisphere will have 2 or 3 weeks of vacation time, and the most popular way to spend that time is 1 week on the North Island, and 2 weeks on the South Island. Along the way you’ll want to hit a few beaches, visit a few wineries, get off the beaten track to check out a few local hiking and biking trails, and most importantly; hike a handful of New Zealand’s Great Walks. Of the 9 Great Walks, the Milford Track is without a doubt the most famous, and for many travellers it’s the single most important reason for choosing to travel to New Zealand.

Female hiker on the Routeburn Track guided walk

The Milford Track is one of the longest established and best-known walking tracks in the country. It starts on the eastern shore of Lake Te Anau and crosses McKinnon Pass to Milford Sound, taking in glacial peaks, a mountain pass, New Zealand’s highest waterfall and the dense rain forest of the West Coast. Some hikers choose to hike the Milford Track in its entirety on a guided walk, or take a day walk on it, along with a handful of other Great Walks nearby.

Fiordland National Park is home to 3 of New Zealand’s 9 Great Walks; the Milford Track, the Routeburn Track and the Kepler Track. All of which are a short drive from one another, but all 3 of these Great Walks have very distinct personalities, and the scenery you’ll experience on each trail clearly distinguishes it from the others, meaning that day hikers can absorb a greater variety of countryside, in the same time as others hike one trail in its entirety.

For those keen hikers looking to complete the Milford Track in its entirety, it’s possible to hike the track solo, or as part of a guided group. The Department of Conservation has placed a limit on the number of hikers using the track to prevent overcrowding and excessive damage to the trail – so with only 40 independent hikers allowed on the trail each day, and Christmas hiking passes selling out months in advance – the next option is to take a guided walk.

New Zealand Great Walk guide making coffee on a stony creek bed

The Milford Track guided walk is four days of breath taking scenery. It’s loaded with additional benefits over doing it solo, and everything’s provided along the way. Hikers enjoy hot showers, bedding, specialist Milford Track guides who will give you an incredible understanding of the local flora and fauna, and there are even hair dryers in the mountain lodges (with upgrades to private rooms upon request). As hikers complete their journey, entering Milford Sound at the end of the 33.5 miles (53 km), it becomes immediately apparent why Rudyard Kipling referred to Milford Sound as the 8th Natural Wonder of the World. Giant granite peaks explode from the black ocean, without a beach in sight. Huge waterfalls land directly in the ocean, where you’ll see native fur seals playing and (often) dolphins or sperm whales too!

Kayaks in Milford sound on a cloudy day

So if you’re from the northern hemisphere and you’re thinking about swapping out your winter woollies for your best pair of hiking boots this Christmas – the great Kiwi countryside is calling your name. Whether you’re hiking the Milford Track solo, hiking it as part of a Milford Track Guided Walk or discovering a handful of New Zealand’s Great Walks – you’ll be heading deep into New Zealand’s pure wilderness – avoiding the crowded shopping malls, bustling cities and hectic beaches.

So start planning your Christmas adventure today, before everyone else finds out about these wilderness hideaways!

Start Planning Your New Zealand Hiking Tour

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America
14 Days in Patagonia: The Ultimate Explorer’s Itinerary

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Fishing Fort Lauderdale Topshotfishing Happy Day Todat Sail/Shark


Fort Lauderdale Fishing with Top Shot Sportfishing Charter Boat and Capt. Zsak

The Sam and Lorraine Evans and their son, Ben, were having a family vacation celebrating Ben graduating from college. They decided to make fishing a part of their celebration, so they chartered the Top Shot Sportfishing charter boat team to do some deep-sea charter boat sport fishing in Fort Lauderdale, FL.

We started out the morning catching live bait, and headed towards the sea bouy in Fort Lauderdale in 120 ft. of water, 1.8 miles from shore. We put out small jigs and caught eight Bullet Bonitos. Next, we hooked the baits up to a wire rig with a single #6 hook and slow trolled the baits, which is another good live-bait method.
The first strike we had ate the bait fish in half and got away. This happened a second time where only the head came back and the bait was ripped in half. We continued slow trolling the Bullet Bonito in 150 feet of water south of Fort Lauderdale. A Shark fin popped up behind the right rigger bait – he ate the bait, and we had this five-foot Shark on for a few minutes, but he got away. We re-rigged and went back to fishing – this happened a second time only the Shark fin was bigger. A seven foot Hammerhead Shark ate the live bait, and the fight was on. First thing we did was clear the lines and then started backing down on the Shark. When you have a big fish with light tackle, it is always best to get as much line back on the reel and help out the angler. After about twenty minutes of fighting, the Shark popped up very close to the boat. Mark, our mate, grabbed the leader line making this an official caught fish. The Shark was not done fighting, though, and sounded for another forty-five minutes. The Shark came up a second time, pictures were taken, and the Shark was released to fight another day.
Next, we decided to try some trolling and put out four surface baits, which were Ballyhoos, and one deep plainer line. I worked the area back and forth looking for signs of life, whether live bait, birds or rip currents, but did not find any, so we decided to go back to live Bullet Bonito slow-trolling fishing. Marc cleared out the trolling spread and put the live baits back out. I started pulling the baits up the reef line, and a nice twenty pound Kingfish ate the bait and jumped out of the water, shook his head and got away. I continued working up to the north of Fort Lauderdale with a second opportunity on a Kingfish, and this time we caught him. We next decided to troll the Ballyhoo over the reef. After an hour, we finally got a bite on the left Ballyhoo rigger bait, and ended up catching a Sailfish. After a great fight, we got the Sailfish in the boat, removed the hooks, took a couple of quick photos, and released the Sailfish.
It was now time to head back to the dock. The anglers retired into the a/c salon and enjoyed the relaxing trip back to the dock at Bahia Bar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd. Fort Lauderdale 33316.

For a successful and adventurous deep sea fishing charter in Fort Lauderdale FL for Sailfish, Shark, Bonito, Mackerel, Swordfish, Snapper, Wahoo, Tuna, Mahi Mahi and Grouper, contact Captain Zsak. – 954-309-7457 or email us at tzsak@bellsouth.net Website: www.topshotfishing.com.



Source link

DIY Seedling Greenhouse Ideas

DIY Seedling Greenhouse Ideas


Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Want to be the BEST prepared
for the WORST to come? Click here to sign up NOW! We'll even throw in a FREE survival tool! (just pay s&h)

Keep reading to know what’s in store for your seedlings this spring even before the snow melts away.

I’m going to show you some simple do-it-yourself greenhouses for your seedlings by using everyday items that can be found around your house. These concepts are very easy to do and will not cost you a fortune. Developing these seedlings in a covered dome to simulate a greenhouse effect is advantageous to their growth. These seeds also need pampering to get them up and growing. And this practice is a good way to give your seeds an awesome start. These survival seed playing cards are your go-to-guide for your survival needs. Check out these ideas below and choose the appropriate one for you. 

1. Egg Carton Greenhouse

Egg Carton Greenhouse | DIY Seedling Greenhouses Ideas For Your Garden This Spring draft

Fill up the egg cartons with potting soil before planting your seeds. As to how deep the seeds will be planted will depend on its size. The bigger the seed, the deeper it goes.

2. Plastic Bottle Greenhouse

Another do-it-yourself greenhouse for your starter plants is by using empty plastic bottles. So don’t just throw them away. You can upcycle them and turn them into awesome seedling greenhouses. Check out the tutorial here. 

3. CD Spindle Case Greenhouse

Who doesn’t have one of these CD spindle cases laying around the house? They make perfect greenhouses for your seedlings! You have two options, either use it as is by placing small potted plants in the case or remove the column in the middle to accommodate larger pots with seedlings. It’s that easy! 

4. Clear Storage Tote Greenhouse

Do you desire to add more plants to your winter or fall garden but you’re experiencing cold nights and warm days in your area? A transportable clear plastic container can be used to store your seedlings inside small canisters or boxes would be a great way to start. Keep them indoors during the night but don’t forget to give them their share of sunshine during the day.

5. Mason Jar Greenhouse

Mason Jar Greenhouse | DIY Seedling Greenhouses Ideas For Your Garden This Spring draft

Old mason jars can make an awesome greenhouse for your seedlings. You just have to make sure there is adequate airflow so the plant can survive.

6. Plastic Wrapped Greenhouse

This homemade mini greenhouse is a good addition to your garden. It is easy to make and very inexpensive. Also, this type of seedling greenhouses is an effective solution if you have problematic seeds. Find out more about this project here.

7. Clear Plastic Greenhouse

All you need is a clear food plastic container with a lid and some tissue paper or cardboard and you can create with this mini greenhouse for your seedlings. Check out the full tutorial here.

If you have the space, get a full-sized greenhouse delivered to you!

Check out this full tutorial video on how to make a DIY seedling starter greenhouse from with a chicken container!  

Upcycling old items and turning it into something more useful is a skill that will serve as good leverage. With a little bit of ingenuity, you can come up with things that will be beneficial to you like these seedling greenhouses. This is an effective way to protect your seedling so they can grow and flourish. Ideas such as these will make your gardening even better without spending a fortune.

Do you have any other DIY greenhouse ideas for your seedlings you would like to share? Add them in the comments below!

 

Save

Print Friendly, PDF & Email





Source link

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America


Share this page on: Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterest

Ever wondered who takes an active vacation trekking in South America? The type of folks who will be your fellow adventurers on an active tour of Peru or Patagonia?

The answer might surprise you—because there is no one answer. We see an endless panoply of unique and interesting individuals, but they do share a few common traits: Openness, curiosity, enthusiasm, courage, and more than a little love of adventure.

Over the years, we’ve identified a few general personality types that many—not all, of course—of our guests tend to display. Take a look at our list and see if you can find yourself or someone you know in one of them. Let us know in the comments if you think we’ve hit the nail on the head with any of them, or know of a type we missed.

 

Aaron the Adventurer – Age 56

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

Aaron is a bank VP by day, with a corner office overlooking a bustling cityscape. He’s a classic adventure personality, escaping the stress of his job with active weekends hiking, biking, and kayaking. Each year, he plans one extraordinary adventure to test his limits, to pit himself against Mother Nature and all she has to offer. Last year, Aaron spent 12 days hiking and kayaking the fiords of Norway.

This year, he’s trekking somewhere new—Patagonia and the infamous “W” trek in the Torres del Paine National Park, a four-day journey through snow-covered mountains and sheer granite cliffs, summiting at one of the most incredible and widely recognized mountain landscapes in the world. At a height of 900 meters (about 3,000 feet), the “Towers of Blue” are believed to be the world’s highest natural cliff faces.

Even that isn’t enough for intrepid Aaron. He’s going to strap on his crampons and shoulder his pick axe to ice climb Grey Glacier in Chile before exploring Argentina’s breathtaking Perito Moreno Glacier. He’s debating a third week to explore Northern Patagonia and the Ring of Fire, the volcanic belt in the Chilean Andes.

 

Culturally Curious Carl and Christine – Ages 48 and 47

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

Carl, an architect, and Christine, a social worker, met 25 years ago on a cultural tour of China during their last year at university, and they’ve always shared a passion for cultural travel. They’ve recently made the last tuition payment for their daughter’s university education and decided to celebrate their new financial freedom with their first couples’ holiday in 13 years—a cultural exploration of Peru seemed like the perfect fit.

They’ll begin in Cuzco, in the heart of the Incan Empire, visiting the archaeological marvels at the “House of the Sun.” They’re excited to hike the Lares Inca Trail to Machu Picchu and watch the morning sun break through Inti Punku, the Sun Gate. They’ll even do some trekking through the Amazon rainforest.

What really speaks to their heart, though, is travelling through the farms and villages of the Andes, especially visiting the Quechua people near Lake Titicaca and experiencing their ancient culture, unchanged over the centuries.

 

Bucket-List Betsey – Age 61

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

Betsey recently retired from her job as a public school administrator and is excited to begin checking items off her bucket list. She was widowed four years ago, but refuses to let her single state prevent her from taking part in the lifetime adventures she always dreamed about. She’s excited to visit the Galapagos Islands to snorkel with the gentle reef sharks, hang out with the marine iguanas, and visit a few giant tortoises.

One of the best parts for Betsey is being part of a congenial travel group—the thought of finding suitable travel companions on her own nearly derailed her plans. She’s excited for the opportunity to meet new people who share her passion for travel and unusual destinations. Spending a few days at a gorgeous seaside lodge and photographing a few friendly dolphins on her journey are just icing on the cake.

 

Zest-for-Life Zoey – Age 33

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

Everyone knows a Zoey. Ours is a city planner in Chicago who lives for stolen weeks away from her cubicle. Single and fun-loving, Zoey loves nothing more than escaping the city and trying new things, preferably far away from the bustle of urban life. She takes a few short getaways during the year and saves for one exceptional adventure each year. Last year, she did the glaciers in Jasper and Banff, but this year, she’s looking for some fun in the sun.

Zoey and two friends are heading for Ecuador and some lifetime adventures—like cycling down Cotopaxi Volcano, hiking the Amazon rainforest, marveling at a cloud forest, and soaking in some amazing hot springs. They’ve got their cameras ready in case they spot the elusive spectacled bear in the grasslands around Quito. They plan to end their excursion with an Ecuadorian street food tour of that ancient mountain city, because what’s better than street food if you want to get to know a city?

 

Globe-Trotting Gabe and Grace and their children Ethan and Amelia – Ages 41, 39, 11, and 8

5 Personality Types Who Love to Trek in South America

Gabe and Grace own a commercial real estate company—the hours are long and the business tends to consume their lives. They love to unwind and reconnect as a family with international travel. Their last two trips were two-week DIY tours of Italy and France, but the planning process, arranging all the details, was so labor intensive, that quite honestly, the trips felt almost like work. This time, they want an interesting, exciting adventure vacation that the whole family could enjoy in a completely stress-free way.

It’s no surprise that our Capybara Peru adventure fits the bill. Everything from logistics to meals are arranged for them so they are free to immerse themselves in unforgettable experiences like motorised canoe rides through the Amazon rainforest (with night-time excursions to spot the nocturnal caiman), shadowing macaw researchers, exploring the Incan ruins of Cuzco, kayaking Lake Titicaca (and learning a few dances from the Quechua people), and even taking a guided tour of Machu Picchu. That Gabe and Grace get a free afternoon in Cuzco while the Active Adventures staff entertains the kids is an almost unbelievable bonus.

They’re even planning to extend their trip for a few days to explore the history and culture of Lima—not to mention the gastronomic delights (Lima’s long been recognized at the food capital of South America).

 

Ready to Embark on an Adventure of Your Own?

Did you recognize yourself in any of our South America travel types? Or find inspiration for your next active adventure holiday?

Why not get in touch today to see how easy it is to arrange the perfect South American adventure trip for you, and even your family? And if you’re not quite ready to chat with a member of our team, sign up for our free email course. You’ll learn everything you ever wanted to know about the amazing experiences waiting for you in South America.

N.b. Characters are fictional and do not match those in images.

Celebrate Like A Kiwi – Hike New Zealand’s Milford Track this Christmas

Comments

comments





Source link

Fishing Forum
 Hooked Something Huge While Night Fishing Under Bridges

Fishing Forum Battling winds and tides, but catches are good!


After a few days of cold temperatures, high winds, and rough seas, causing me to cancel a couple of trips, Saturday, 1/20/18, was finally calm enough to get offshore. I fished in spots from 18 to 28 miles west of New Pass with Joe Hahn and his friends, Bob, Mike, David, and George. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release a bluefish, twenty-some red grouper shorts to 18 inches, as well as five sharks, consisting of four blacktips and one sharpnose, all of which were around the 40-inch mark. We also had a huge shark (variety unknown) grab a piece of cut-bait, run, and break off, exploding the water around us. As for dinner, the guys boxed eighteen keeper lane snapper.

Monday morning, 1/22, I fished 22 miles west of New Pass with Frank Dwyer and his son-in-law, Ryan. The guys used cut-bait and squid to catch and release twenty-six red grouper shorts, and to cull ten keeper lane snapper to 13 inches, along with a half-dozen 13 to 14-inch grunts.

Tuesday morning, 1/23, I headed out in a light drizzle with Drew VanWerden and his two young sons. Seas were calm, and we headed out 22 miles, but the rain persisted, at one point turning into a heavy shower. We had enough wet-weather gear to keep us dry, and the boys didn’t mind fishing in the rain and in the fog that followed. They used squid and cut-bait to catch and release a 17-inch cobia, twenty-one red grouper shorts to 18 inches, and lots of grunts to 12 inches. The lane snapper were biting well, and the guys caught twenty-seven keeper lanes to 13-inches.

Winds picked up ahead of another cool front moving into the area, and that produced some choppy sea conditions on Wednesday, 1/24. But, long-time customers and hardy father-son anglers Larry and Chris Baumgartner weren’t intimidated! They fished 22 miles west of New Pass with me in a stiff 20-to-25 knot wind most of the morning, and used squid and cut-bait to catch a variety of fish. They lost one big grouper that swam to the bottom and cut the line, and they released red grouper shorts, an 18-inch gag grouper, and a 14-inch scamp grouper. They also caught five mangrove snapper, three of which were keepers ranging 13 inches to 15 inches. They caught over twenty grunts, and boxed a few of the largest of those, along with four porgies in the 13-to-14-inch range.

Frequent customer Mike Connealy and his son, Clint, had to trade their offshore plans for some inshore, catch-and-release fishing on a very windy Friday morning, 1/26. There were small craft advisories offshore, and even the bay presented some challenges in a relentless wind of about 25 knots. The guys used live shrimp to catch and release thirteen sheepshead to 13 inches, two crevalle jacks that were each about 12 inches, and a 15-inch black drum.

Winds persisted through the weekend. I fished inshore in southern Estero Bay on Sunday, 1/28, with Stan and Jean Dzedzy and their son and daughter-in-law, Dave and Debbie. The family used live shrimp to catch three keeper sand bream, a 15-inch drum, a 17-inch drum, and a 17-inch pompano. They released fifteen sheepshead shorts and two mangrove snapper shorts. The photo shown is of Dave Dzedzy with a 17-inch pompano, caught on shrimp on his inshore trip 1/28/18.

Monday, 1/29, I awoke to light rain and fog, with another cold front expected to arrive over-night and into Tuesday. Seas were choppy first thing in the morning, and it remained misty after the fog lifted, but seas calmed a little by mid-morning. I began fishing at the near-shore reefs with Lee Larsens and his friends, Carey, Jerry, and Rick, but there was very little action there. So, as seas calmed down a bit, we ventured out further to about fifteen miles offshore. Fishing was tough everywhere, and I can’t recall the last time I saw such slow action at several of my typically productive spots. The guys used squid and cut-bait to catch and release two whitings, a few blue runners, one red grouper short, and a few grunts.

With small craft advisories issued for Tuesday, 1/30, and predictions for seas of four-to-six feet, I canceled my planned offshore trip, which had already been rescheduled from the previous week’s rough weather!

By Thursday, 2/1, seas were finally calm enough to get out about 23 miles west of New Pass, where I fished with frequent customers, Ron Musick, Richard Arnett, and Eddie Alfonso. There were tons of little bait fish everywhere, and lots of undersized fish biting, but the guys were able to box some food-fish, consisting of three keeper lane snapper, a 13-inch mangrove snapper, two porgies, and a few nice-sized grunts. They released twenty-plus red grouper shorts and four mangrove snapper shorts. Everything bit on squid and cut-bait.

Friday morning, 2/2, seas were calm when I fished a catch-and-release trip 19 miles west of New Pass with William Connors, Mike Connors, and friends Dan, Mark, and Pat. The guys used squid and cut bait to catch and release twenty-four red grouper shorts, a mess of grunts, and mangrove snapper to 16 inches. The photo shown is of Mike Connors with a 16-inch mangrove snapper, caught on squid on his offshore trip 2/2/18.

Winds picked up on Saturday, 2/3, and we were back to choppy seas offshore, with a small craft advisory issued. So, Roman Jahnke and his dad, Tom, who were treating Roman’s son, Roarke, to a fishing trip for his tenth birthday, traded offshore plans for some inshore fishing on the flats of southern Estero Bay. The family used live shrimp to catch five keeper black drum to 16 inches, and they released ten sheepshead shorts, a crevalle jack, and two stingray that were each about three pounds.

You can view our fishing action videos at http://fishbustercharters.com/fishing videos.html



Source link