During and After a Natural Disaster

During and After a Natural Disaster


When we think of preparing we think about preparing before something happens and for during. Often times the aftermath of a survival situation is overlooked. Here we have some first-hand accounts for what a survival situation was like both during and after a natural disaster. These are true first-hand accounts provided by our lovely members of the Family Protection Association Facebook Group. These individuals agreed to share their stories in hopes of helping others in their long-term preparations.

 

 

 

Robert Gunter, Tornado:

Jan 2nd, 2017, Albany Georgia had several massive tornadoes tear through our area uprooting trees and power lines. It was a rough and fear-filled night. After the tornados, we were without power for over a week and the worst part was, it was dead winter. Around 20° at night and we had no heat.

Thankfully we had some non-perishables and a grill to cook on…we huddled up in blankets at night and toughed out the cold. During the day we cleaned up what debris we could so the city could start cleaning up the massive trees.

We have a fireplace in our home but we could not use it because it was closed up years ago. All in all, we survived a week with no power in the freezing cold with little food and I’m here to tell you we survived. It was hard but I had been studying survival for some time and I think that helped out a lot with me, my wife and son surviving the way we did.”

The Facts:

There are 1,300 Tornadoes every year in the US with 60 people every year being killed during them, usually by flying or falling debris. Robert’s survival knowledge ensured that he focused on the important details for ensuring safety for himself and his family for both during and after. The most unexpected occurrence for after the disaster was the length of time the power was down, a factor whose length of time is almost always uncertain.   

Check out During and After a Natural Disaster at https://survivallife.com/natural-disaster-during-after/

 

Jared Barnett, Contaminated Water:

You may or may not have heard on the news that this summer blue-green algae bloom at Detroit Lake comprised the drinking water of Salem OR (where I live), as well as several smaller communities that draw their tap water from the same source for more than a month. This was not an issue in my home as we store water as part of our preps.
While the neighboring satellite community of Keizer helped with the situation through businesses and public buildings opening their faucets as water filling stations (since they draw their water from a well or wells), and the local government was actually quick to deploy national guard tankers as temporary water filling stations within Salem itself (though the lines were long, and you were limited in the amount you could get each day),.

I did notice that people were quickly buying up the bottled water in stores and that certain items in the stores (such as fresh bakery and deli goods) were unavailable. I also heard on the news of some places price gouging, charging as much as $35 for a case of bottled water that would normally sell for somewhere around $5. Some people did get sick, with food poisoning like symptoms, including my boss from drinking the water (as the safety warning was said to only be for young children, elderly, pregnant/nursing women, and pets), but I don’t recall hearing about any fatalities.”

The Facts:

Not all natural disasters come from above and in those cases, it is even more of a surprise when it happens. Most people would expect an Earthquake before natural water contamination but water contamination is almost a higher possibility in some areas than an Earthquake.

We have seen multiple instances of companies and stores bumping up water costs after situations like Jared’s in some cases increasing the price astronomically after the fact. Proper water storage is paramount for during and after any natural disaster.

 

Check out During and After a Natural Disaster at https://survivallife.com/natural-disaster-during-after/

 

Bugsy, Hurricane Florence:

Here on the coast of NC, the evacuation notices start with the outer banks and coastal towns and cities so that ferries and bridges can be shut down without endangering people who wish to evacuate. Many of us don’t have the money to just pack up and leave for who knows how long but,  even if we could, by the time the mandatory evac was announced for Onslow county it was too late. The gas stations were out of gas and everyone was out of propane tanks. So whether leaving or staying, you would have to do it on the fly and with whatever you already had on hand because the stores were also all out of water, real food, candles, batteries, lamp fuel etc.

Every hotel and motel within a tank of gas radius was either booked or closed if it didn’t rate as suitable to withstand the storm. So we prepared to shelter in place. The streets were like a ghost town and before the storms first rains started falling there had already been looting of drug stores, a footlocker and some other businesses around town.

(A curfew was declared the next day and lasted 4 days after the storm had passed.)

I luckily have plenty of provisions and camping/survival gear so with bathtubs filled, water jugs topped off and 2 propane tanks from my grill and gas fireplace on the deck, we were ready.  Power was lost around 2100 the first night but the storm was still pretty tame and the house still cool enough for the a/c to get our last good night sleep for the duration of the hurricane. No generator. Just hurricane lamps, candles, and a few LED flashlights.

The next day the storm picked up and started to rip trees out of the ground and shutters/shingles/siding off the houses. I have a covered front porch which allowed us to leave 2 windows and the front door open to get some breeze in the house(it was still humid and muggy even though we hadn’t seen the sun in 2 days.) That’s when I had a visitor come to my open front door and ask for a lighter. I gave him one and sent him on his way but as I said in my post on FPA, I’m still not sure a light was the original intent.  

While most people might think that going days without power would be miserable, it wasn’t that bad at my house. We ate like kings! Salmon for dinner and steaks for breakfast.  Not because we are rich or cause it was easy sailing but because we ate everything out of the freezer as it melted to ensure it didn’t go to waste and to save the “survival pantry” in case we were stranded for weeks before the flooding went down and power could be restored.

It was a long 2-3 days of actual hurricane/ tropical storm force weather. We stood on our porch and watched the coast guard helicopters rescue people a block away from us. Once the storm calmed we did a drive around the town to check on things and the linemen were already staged and ready to get to work once they got the all clear. We saw plates from Indiana, Ohio, Arkansas, Tennessee. They drove into the storm to study at a Marriott here in town with fleets of vehicles overflowing the longhorns steakhouse parking lot. All the first responders did, and are still doing, an amazing job. The red cross, the salvation army,  even Billy Graham response team can be found in store parking lots to help everyone through this.

All these people who debate on Facebook as to whether you should stay or go have no idea what it’s like when this thing is barreling down on you.  Of the 8 different households of family, I have 4 of them lost everything. So basically a coin toss. The one family that evac to PA, hydroplaned off the road and rolled their vehicle down an embankment. Totaled the SUV and put them all in the hospital.  

So there is no RIGHT answer. 2 of my neighbors are elderly and on oxygen. They couldn’t afford to evac on what they get from SS so they HAD to wait for the mandatory evac notice so that way the county would evac them under public safety guidelines. (They do the same for hospitals and prisons once the mandatory becomes official. We still have inmates spread out to other prisons til these can be repaired and dried out. I luckily got power back on the 6th day but there are still places that will be without for 6 weeks or more. “

The Facts:

Hurricanes are a no-joke prepare for the worst, hope for the best type of situation. Not only do you have to prep for the actual hurricane, but you also have storm surges, mass panic, and so much more to prep for as well. Bugsy does make a valid point when saying that there is no right answer though.

Check out During and After a Natural Disaster at https://survivallife.com/natural-disaster-during-after/

Aftermath Preparedness:

Preparedness plans are deeply personal and only you know what the right move is. When talking about your plans with your loved ones and obtaining stock for those survival situations it is imperative that you look beyond the before and try to anticipate what could happen during and after as well. Not only what could happen within and around your home but also what potential issues could arise within the community around you. All the while ensuring that these preparations meet to the needs of you and your family.

 

For more information on surviving Natural Disasters be sure to check out our Hurrican Survival Tips and our Tornado Survival Tips!

If you would like more information on our wonderful Facebook Group community be sure to click here and send a request to join!

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Natural Raccoon Deterrents That Will Send The Critters Packing Away

Natural Raccoon Deterrents That Will Send The Critters Packing Away


Raccoons may look cute and even pitiful at times, but they do pose a threat. By being potential rabies virus-carriers, they are a danger to you, your family, and your pets. We can never stress enough the dangers and troubles these critters pose, so check out these tried-and-tested natural raccoon deterrents we’ve collected for you.

These homemade raccoon repellent ideas offer choices suited to your needs and budget. In searching, we came across 8 ways to naturally deter these pesky critters. Also, I will share tips on steps you can take to help keep them away for good!

Natural Raccoon Deterrents You Can Count On!

 

1. Cayenne Pepper Spray to Protect Your Garden

Cayenne Pepper Spray to Protect Your Garden | Send Raccoons Packing With These Natural Deterrents
Cayenne Pepper Spray to Protect Your Garden Photo by Sanawell

Raccoons are chicken predators and they wreak havoc in vegetable gardens. Dealing with a raccoon infestation can be a very frustrating situation! Cayenne pepper is one of the natural raccoon deterrents and a great way to repel critters and pests. These pesky rodents hate the smell of cayenne. It makes it an effective ingredient then, in homemade animal repellent sprays.

What you’ll need:

  • A small canister of cayenne pepper
  • 1 bottle of hot sauce
  • 1 gallon of water

Instructions:

  • Add 1 small canister of cayenne pepper and 1 bottle of hot sauce to 1 gallon of water
  • Spray the solution all over your garden plants, bushes, and shrubs
  • Reapply after rainfall.

2. Ammonia

Ammonia | Send Raccoons Packing With These Natural Deterrents
Ammonia Photo by More Than Today

Raccoons cause trouble both in rural and urban areas where they can be a problem all year round. They may also carry distemper, roundworm, and fleas. They wreak havoc on trash cans, creating a huge mess and attracting other animals and insects. Ammonia is another effective raccoon control solution.

How to use ammonia to deter raccoons:

  • Position several ammonia-soaked rags near/around the entrances of the raccoon’s nest
  • Spray ammonia around the places where raccoons have been spotted
  • Sprinkle one cup of ammonia solution around the inside of each trash can
  • Spray ammonia on the ground in the places to where raccoons are drawn

3. Mothballs

Mothballs | Send Raccoons Packing With These Natural Deterrents
Mothballs Photo by Gardenerdy

Raccoons hate the odor of mothballs. So, it’s used by homeowners to get rid of raccoons in attics and crawlspaces. But if left in such places for a long time, the chemicals can seep into the rest of your house, exposing people to it. Mothballs can be ingested by pets or even small children. Use this method with extreme caution.

4. Predator Urine

Predator Urine | Send Raccoons Packing With These Natural Deterrents
Predator Urine Photo by Amazon

This deterrent method will trick raccoons into thinking predators are nearby. It will likely scare them away. This raccoon deterrent is available in sporting goods stores and many online retailers. Look for urine from wolves, coyotes, bobcats, or mountain lions. Use it around areas where raccoons are dwelling.

5. Another Method to Protect Your Garden: Epsom Salt

Another Method to Protect Your Garden: Epsom Salt | Send Raccoons Packing With These 8 Natural Deterrents
Another Method to Protect Your Garden: Epsom Salt Photo by Flickr/Kazuhiro Keino

Raccoons can be very destructive to your vegetable garden. Lucky they don’t like the smell of Epsom salt. To deter raccoons using this method, sprinkle Epsom salt around and inside your vegetable garden. The masked critters will avoid your garden altogether and most likely will not return. However, you will need to reapply every time it rains or after a couple of weeks with no rain.

6. Secure Your Chicken Coop

Secure Your Chicken Coop | Send Raccoons Packing With These Natural Deterrents
Secure Your Chicken Coop Photo by The Tangled Nest

You don’t need to make your chicken coop into a fortress to protect your chickens from raccoons, but it helps. Raccoons can open many latches, so use a latch you can padlock to keep the windows, doors, and other openings on your coop securely locked during evening and nighttime hours. Use a strong wire mesh with small openings that are no larger than 1/2 inch to keep raccoons from reaching into your coop or breaking through it. Put a roof on your coop and fasten it down tightly. If a raccoon can’t break into your coop easily, he will likely move on and not return.

7. More Tips to Keep Raccoons Away

There are certain steps you can take which are effective in discouraging these critters from your property. They are simple yet necessary to ensure they don’t feel free to roam around.

  • Keep trash cans lids secure with bungee cords
  • Keep your yard clean and free from any litter which attracts and invites critters to rummage through your property
  • Pick up your pet’s water bowls at night
  • Pick up your pet’s food bowls at night

8. Motion-Activated Sprinklers

Motion-activated repellents, specifically sprinkler repellents, are all-natural since they use only water to scare off raccoons. There are downsides, like they can be expensive by itself, and they do rack up your utility bills. There are solar-powered repellents which are just effective. Another thing is, it’s only limited to a certain area. It can only secure a few square meters, so this is perfect to raccoon-proof your garden. Watch the related video below to know more about the motion-activated sprinkler natural raccoon deterrents.

 

Hit the play button to watch this interesting video from Backyard Boogi for a review on the motion activated sprinkler for raccoons and other critters:

All kinds of critters can invade your home, making your life more difficult and your family less safe. Raccoons are especially notorious for causing havoc in your yard and home if left unattended. Not one of these natural raccoon deterrents is solely effective by itself. One could work for a while but raccoons are intelligent creatures which figure out your tactics after some time. Respect and understand the creature to know what works for the long term.

Which of the natural raccoon deterrents have you tried before? Share your experience about it in the comments section below!

Up Next: Tips On How To Survive In The Wild | Defending Against Animal Attack

For awesome survival gear, you can’t make at home, check out the Survival Life Store!

Check out Is Dutch Oven Cooking A Part Of Your Emergency Plan? [Video Tutorial] at https://survivallife.com/dutch-oven-cooking-video-tutorial/

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Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on July 29, 2016, and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

 

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How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources

How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources


My first piece of advice on how to build a shelter from natural materials is to look around for something man-made. In my last article, we talked about the use of a vehicle or vessel to keep us safe. But there are times when Mother Nature provides a hollow cave or natural covering.

This time around, I’m going to share some of the experiences I’ve had when Lady Luck is smiling down on someone else. There are times when we wish to build primitive shelters from scratch primarily with natural materials, but we aren’t always successful in foraging for these.

Unless you’re trained in thatching roofs, chances are your survival shelter is going to let water in when it rains. A plastic bag buried in your purse or pocket will go a long way towards providing a precious bit of waterproofing.

How to Build a Shelter with the Materials Around You

Building A Teepee

Building A Teepee | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Teepee Photo by Clip 2 Art

This lovely leaf teepee that we built in the Smoky Mountains looks to be the epitome of primitive shelter building yet hidden beneath its lush foliage is a trash bag covering the apex. Thankfully it didn’t rain but it was very comforting to know that if it did we would remain dry, even if it meant sitting upright and back to back. As the weather turned out to be dry I sometimes wish we had lain down on the trash bag instead as were eaten alive by chiggers on this expedition. Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

In my experience, bindings made from roots or vines are rarely as robust as commercially manufactured strings, ropes, and cords. You may think that you don’t have anything like that with you, but take a look at your clothes. Your clothing is your first line of defense in any survival situation and not just in the most literal sense– what are you wearing that you could adapt and use?

A little trick that Myke taught me is to replace my boot laces with 550 paracords and wrap a few extra lengths round for good measure. It’s a pain in the backside if you ever have to travel through airport security but a lifesaver out in the bush. Even if you don’t have 550 cord, your regular shoelaces will work wonders in tying the struts of your shelter together. As will fabric strips ripped from the bottom of a shirt or skirt. A single string of 550 cord cinched together the top of this teepee in the Smokies. Always be sure to retrieve your cord, natural or otherwise, when you move on.

Building A Teepee | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Teepee Photo by Pinterest

Another useful tip, though glaringly obvious, is making sure your shelter is big enough for you to fit into.

A single person can crunch into a remarkably small place, albeit with some discomfort, but if you’re making a temporary home for more than one person or your whole family it’s a good idea to test it out size wise. As a mother, I’m always thinking things like, “Would my little boy cope with this? Would this type of shelter work if he was with us?”

This is Myke and I testing our shelter for size. Well, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it!

Building A Teepee | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Teepee Photo by Kotaksurat

Using A Poncho For Shelter

Using A Poncho For Shelter | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Using A Poncho For Shelter Photo by Pinterest

One of my absolute favorite items of clothing because its multi-faceted nature is the military poncho, yet I had never even heard of one before I met my husband. These days I carry one in my car, my camping kit, my survival bag and we have several others littered around the house that our boy plays in. In addition to keeping you dry, a poncho has many potential uses in a survival situation; a rucksack, a raft, a tarp, a medical stretcher and a smokehouse, to name but a few. And they make quick and awesome survival shelters. You can string one up in whatever manner you fancy or if you don’t have enough cord to construct a ‘tent’ just lay one over any primitive shelter that you have made to act as extra waterproofing.

Here in Alaska, we strung one between two trees and then I filled the open sides with large leaves to help keep the heat in. When using a poncho in wet climes be sure to tie off the hood so you don’t get leaks. Conversely, when it’s scorching prop the hood open so it acts as a vent.

There, of course, might be times when you do have next to nothing on you or with you that you can use and you have to create a shelter from what you have around you. My least favorite is the debris shelter, but sometimes there is no choice. For those who don’t know, a debris shelter is created by basically scraping up old branches and leaves and piling them into a rudimentary shield against the elements. We used one once when we were caught in a sudden tropical storm in Dominica. Itchy, uncomfortable and wet.

Using old branches and logs has obvious risks, other things are also likely to be using them as a home – sometimes stinging insects and arachnids but I have also seen lethal poison dart frogs in old logs in the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica. I also once sat on a fer de lance in a fallen tree in the Peruvian Amazon. This snake kills more people in South America than any other. Not what you want as a bedfellow.

Building A Lean-t0

Building A Lean-t0 | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Lean-to Photo by Pinterest

Another basic shelter to make when you’re too exhausted to do anything else or perhaps when the light is fading is the ‘lean-to’. I was making this one on a Lost Survivors shoot for Travel Channel as the sun was going down in the Appalachians in Kentucky. The main spine was an old tree trunk that had fallen and caught on another tree (not fallen to the ground) then I placed cut branches and leaves to form the back wall. It was another night on the forest floor, which is never ideal but the shelter blocked a harsh wind that was kicking up.

On a separate trip to Kentucky, we wove a kind of cocoon out of river cane. We stuck either end of the canes into the ground to create a series of arches and then wove thinner more supple pieces of cane between the struts to make the walls. You can use this technique with any kind of reed or wood that is pliable enough, willow for example.

Building A Lean-t0 | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Lean-t0 Photo by Kotaksurat

In the close-up picture of me standing in front of it, you can see pretty flowers embedded in the walls. This wasn’t an attempt to create bucolic loveliness out in the wilds but rather an eye-saving mechanism, the cut cane was razor sharp and the flowers marked the dagger-like ends.

Building A Lean-t0 | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Lean-t0 Photo by Kotaksurat

It is without a doubt better to sleep up off the floor if you can. Even a layer of cut branches on the ground will insulate you from the cold. Another very important reason to be up is so you are not in the path of creatures that could otherwise hurt or kill you. This is particularly true in tropical jungles and swamps.

My favorite shelter of all time was one we built on the edge of a beach in Aitutaki in the South Pacific. It was a platform protruding at one end from the top of some pandanus tree prop roots and supported at the other by tripods we made by lashing three sticks together. The roof was a separate structure, a bit like a carport, crafted from palm leaves.

Building A Lean-t0 | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Lean-t0 Photo by Pinterest

Building A Platform Shelter

Pandanus trees are great for shelter making, they look a little like palm trees but have these mangrove style prop roots. It’s the roots that are special, they are both sturdy and bendy. We made the cross slats of the platform from these roots. Once they were covered in palm fronds, it was like sleeping in a bed. They bounce a little when you lay down. Wonderful!

Building A Platform Shelter | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Building A Platform Shelter Photo by Pinterest

The mosquitoes in Aitutaki were bad, the noise was like the whirring of a cheap hairdryer. All night long.

However, the view in the morning made life a little easier to bear.

Building A Platform Shelter | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources

The first time I visited the Amazon rainforest we constructed a more elaborate version of the Aitutaki platform shelter. Unlike in our South Sea haven Amazonian land animals like to bite you, sting you and eat you.

Quick Tip: Bringing Fire Into Your Shelter

Getting off the ground is an essential, not a luxury.

Fire is also vital for protection in the deep jungle. Though our platform was too high to feed a fire without having to climb down, repeatedly, to the forest floor.

A problem exacerbated that we had our boots off at night to dry out our feet and prevent jungle rot.

Mike came up with the ingenious solution of having the fire in the shelter with us!

Quick Tip: Bringing Fire Into Your Shelter | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Quick Tip: Bringing Fire Into Your Shelter Photo by Kotaksurat

We built another mini wood platform on our sleeping platform. Afterward, we daubed a layer of thick clay on top of it to prevent the fire from burning through. We had very few insect problems because it also acted as a smudge fire. A fair bit of the smoke was trapped in the shelter with us because of the roof. We didn’t wake to the same amazing view as in Aitutaki. Thanks to our choice of shelter we made it through the night without becoming dinner for a jaguar.

Quick Tip: Bringing Fire Into Your Shelter | How To Build A Shelter Using Natural Resources
Quick Tip: Bringing Fire Into Your Shelter Photo by Kotaksurat

Watch this video by J&J acres on how to build a teepee:

There is no blueprint for shelter building. Terrain and circumstance will dictate the final structure. If I look back over the years and remember every single one that I’ve slept in, each one was different, each had its own set of quirks, foibles, discomforts, and itches. You rarely sleep well in a wilderness shelter but out in the wilds, it is always better to have one than not.

Do you trust in these methods of building a shelter? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Up Next: Survival Shelters: Things You Need To Know

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in February 2014 and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

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Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping

Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Making sure that the flock is healthy is vital in chicken and duck keeping. Besides, hatching and harvesting the food you put on the table is the best way to know what your family is really being served on their dinner plates. Raising chickens and ducks and keeping them healthy is essential for them to continue laying quality eggs and eating bugs to prevent these pests from destroying the garden. Chickens and ducks are vulnerable to common poultry health issues like Coccidiosis, a deadly parasitic disease that is known as the number one killer of chicks and ducklings. While your birds don’t really need costly hormone injections and antibiotics, I suggest you give these spices a try to aid you in chicken and duck keeping.

Chicken and Duck Keeping | Natural Flock Remedies

 

1. Black Pepper

Black Pepper | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Black pepper contains a lot of vitamins and nutrients. It also functions as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antioxidant. In addition, it helps flush toxins and absorb nutrients from its food sources. Chickens are prone to respiratory problems. Adding a few pinches of black pepper to their feed or in their water can help prevent respiratory problems and ease coughing.

2. Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne Pepper | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


For many years, farmers normally add pepper to chicken and duck feed or water to boost egg production. Worm diseases are known to hamper the flock’s ability to reproduce in which cayenne pepper is a very effective remedy. Cayenne pepper burns parasites that make their way into the digestive system. Simply add half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper to your chicken feed as a natural way to deworm them.

3. Oregano

 Oregano | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


The essential oil of Oregano is a natural antibiotic. Oregano can be given to ducks and chickens in the form of an essential oil, fresh or dried. It can help prevent coccidiosis, blackhead, E.coli, avian flu, and bronchitis. You can add dried oregano to feed or water or simply sprinkle them in the brooder or coop as a free choice snack. Add extra oregano to the diet of laying hens to give them an added immune system booster.

 

 

4. Cinnamon

Cinnamon | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Cinnamon reduces inflammation and boasts of anti-infectious, antibacterial and antioxidant properties as well. It also aids in the prevention of neurological disease. A compound in the spice helps enhance blood flow to the feet, wattles, and combs to ward off frostbite. It also may help with the prevention of congestion, coughing, infection, and respiratory problems.

5. Turmeric

Turmeric | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Turmeric is best known for its powerful antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. If your chickens or ducks get “Bumblefoot” – intense and highly visible swelling of the foot or lower leg, turmeric can likely help. Chicks that are unable to hold their head up properly can benefit from adding a pinch of turmeric to their feed. Turmeric also helps boost a hen’s immunity to fight infection by adding 1/2 teaspoon to their feed.

RELATED: Hen Pecked: An In-Depth Interview On Raising Chickens

6. Salt

Salt | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Chickens and ducks, just like the rest of us, need to steer clear of too much salt. But, the delicious spice should still be kept in your natural remedies tub for emergencies. During the hot summer months, salt might be essential to treating a flock suffering from heat exhaustion. It makes a great homemade electrolyte for chickens and ducks.

Mix together 1 cup of water, 1/8 of a teaspoon of salt, 1 ½ teaspoons of sugar, and 1/8 of a teaspoon of baking soda to make the natural electrolyte. Offer the mixture to the flock members suffering from heat exhaustion or mix it into their water. To help cool the flock, freeze one of their favorite healthy treats in an ice cube tray and serve.

7. Garlic

Garlic | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Garlic not only helps boost the respiratory and immune systems, it also helps to repel ticks, mites, lice and other common parasites who like to claim the members of your flock for their new home. It also serves as a natural wormer and may even reduce the stench of manure by adding to the feed on a regular basis. You can also float whole cloves in the waterer to administer the spice to your flock. Sprinkle a pinch or two of garlic powder over dry feed as a natural health supplement for the flock.

8. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Add a teaspoon of the vinegar to the water twice a week during the warm weather months to help boost calcium absorption. It is known that hens struggle with calcium absorption in the summer far more than any other members of the flock. As a result, drop in calcium will likely cause laying issues and negatively impact eggshell hardiness.

9. Ginger

Ginger | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


If a member of the flock has lost its appetite, ginger just might do the trick and spark a desire to eat again. The spice is also often used to help ease an upset stomach, reduce congestion, and as an immune system booster. Ginger also boasts strong anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. Add a small pinch of dried ginger to feed or cast inside the chicken or duck habitat as a free choice supplement. A pinch of dried ginger can also promote the production of large eggs.

10. Respiratory Tea

Respiratory Tea | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping


Serve the sick flock members this delicious and healthy tea get over congestion or respiratory system problem. They absolutely love it, so no coaxing will be necessary to get them to dive right into the “medicine.”

Boil seven cups of water and 3 teaspoons of Astragalus root or oregano for about four minutes. Remove the pot from the stove and add about a half teaspoon each of any/all the following ingredients: chamomile, lavender, peppermint essential oil, turmeric, cinnamon, black OR cayenne pepper. Allow the tea to cool for at least 10 minutes, strain, and then serve in a waterer.

 

Watch this short video about holistic remedies for chickens by Tractor Supply Company:

It’s great to know these spices are good alternatives to keep birds healthy other than the many ways they make our food tastier. You could even take advantage of your regular supply of spices without having to spend more money. Well, unless you have a really big poultry in your backyard, there’s no reason to set aside a considerable budget. After all, the natural approach to chicken and duck keeping is always the best and safest way around.

What can you say about these natural remedies for chicken and duck keeping? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Up Next: Composting For Beginners | The Building Blocks To A Better Harvest

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Infographic | Top 10 Natural Remedies for Chicken and Duck Keeping

Editor’s Note – This post was originally published in October 19, 2017, and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

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11 Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

11 Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good


Take a shot at these ways to rid your home of roaches without using harsh chemicals! Applying these natural ways to get rid of cockroaches is a longer process than when using hazardous pesticides. But for the sake and safety of your family and pets, taking it one step at a time is all worth it. Besides the roach exterminator cost can really take a dent in your budget. In this article, we will share with you the natural ways to rid your home of roaches slowly but safely.

Ways to Rid Your Home of Roaches the Safe and Natural Way!

1. Boric Acid

Boric Acid | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

Boric acid is basically safe for use around the household and has been used specifically as an insecticidal substance. But take though because it can be irritating to the skin so make sure to keep it away from children. To make an effective boric acid roach killer mix a part of powdered sugar to three parts of boric acid. The sugar will lure the roaches to the mixture and will terminate the cockroaches. Sprinkle or spread the mixture in areas frequented by roaches.

2. Wet Coffee Grounds (Water Tar Trap)

Wet Coffee Grounds (Water Tar Trap) | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

What you’ll need:

  • 2-3 Large glass jars
  • Wet coffee grounds
  • Water
  • 2-3 Small cups

Instructions:

  • Fill the large glass jars about halfway with water.
  • Place the coffee grounds in the small cups.
  • Place one small cup inside one large glass jar. Make 2-3 similar setups with a small cup inside every glass jar.
  • Place these jars where you see roaches the most.
  • Roaches will be attracted by the aroma of the coffee and try to enter into the jar.
  • Once the roaches fall into the water jar, it is nearly impossible for them to escape.
  • Check the jars daily and discard any dead roaches.
  • Make new traps daily.
  • Repeat this process until you discover no sign of roaches within the traps for a couple of days.

3. Liquid Fabric Softener

Liquid Fabric Softener | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

Roaches breathe through their lower body. When you spray fabric softener on roaches, it will produce difficulty in their breathing and roaches will die due to suffocation.

What you’ll need:

  • Spray bottle
  • Water
  • Fabric softener

Instructions:

  • Make a spray by mixing 3 parts liquid fabric softener with 2 parts water.
  • Fill a spray bottle with this mixture.
  • Spray this solution on the roaches; making sure the solution hits the lower mid-region and head of the roach.
  • In addition, spray this mixture wherever you see evidence of roaches.

4. Ammonia-Water Solution

Ammonia-Water Solution | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

What you’ll need:

  • 2 cups of ammonia
  • 1 bucket of water

Instructions:

  • Add 2 cups of ammonia to the bucket of water.
  • Wash the hard surfaces of your kitchen and bathroom daily with this solution.

Ammonia works effectively as a repellent for roaches due to its sharp smell. Roaches will leave your home in no time using this method.

5. Catnip

Catnip | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

While cats love the smell of catnip and it’s non-toxic to humans and animal, the same cannot be said for roaches. It will send the cockroaches flying to wherever they came from. While the effect is not permanent, you can always reinforce it with any of the roach killers here. You can make a catnip tea where you can spray in areas where cockroaches might be hiding.

Note: This natural repellent should only be used in homes without cats!

 

6. Listerine Spray

Listerine Spray | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

What you’ll need:

Instructions:

  • Mix equal parts of water and Listerine to make a solution and add two drops of dishwashing fluid to it.
  • Add this mixture to a spray bottle and spray areas where you have seen evidence of roaches; also can be sprayed directly on the roaches.

 7. Soapy Water – To Kill Roaches On Contact

Soapy Water - To Kill Roaches On Contact | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

As I mentioned before, roaches breathe through their body and spraying them with soapy water will suffocate them.

What you’ll need:

Instructions: Add 3 tbsp of Dawn dishwashing liquid to 4-6 oz of water. Using a spray bottle, spray this mixture directly on roaches to kill them on contact.

8. Essential Oils – Citronella, Peppermint, or Lemongrass

Essential Oils - Citronella, Peppermint, or Lemongrass | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

It’s amazing how the scent we love, cockroaches hate. You will love this essential oil trick which will make your home smelling heavenly and cockroach-free. Soak some cotton balls in the essential oil of your choice. From lemongrass, citronella, cypress, tea tree oil, and peppermint, they can all be effective. Place the essential oil-soaked balls in areas around the home where the cockroaches are hiding. Or, you can also make this essential oil spray cockroach repellent.

  • Make a spray solution by putting half a cup of water in a spray bottle
  • Add 10 drops of peppermint essential oil
  • Add 5 drops of cypress essential oil.
  • Mix and spray in areas desired frequented by cockroaches

9. Bay Leaves

Bay Leaves | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

Unlike us, who sniffs at bay leaves before throwing them to a dish cooking, cockroaches hate the scent of bay leaves. For this, bay leaves are a fantastic way to get rid of cockroaches naturally. You simply need to crush a handful of bay leaves, then spread them in areas where cockroaches may be hiding.

10. Edible Baking Soda

Edible Baking Soda | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

The amazing baking soda simply has no bounds to the wonderful things it can do for our home. With the many benefits of baking soda around the home, it’s incredible they are effective roach killers, too. Apparently, when baking soda comes to contact with water, it just expands.

To make a simple and safe cockroach repellent, mix edible baking soda and sugar in equal parts and sprinkle them in crevices and areas they frequent. The cockroaches will consume them and you know what will happen next.

11. Cedar

Cedar | Natural Ways To Rid Your Home of Roaches For Good

Cedar also ranks one of the plants which a few insects find disgusting, and it includes cockroaches. Thujone–an essential oil present in cedar is the culprit. While we find the aroma pleasant, insects are averse to it. Leave pieces of cedar in the kitchen are areas where they could be frequenting to stop these intruders in their tracks.

Learn how to get rid of cockroaches in 4 easy steps in this video from Solutions Pest & Lawn:

We may never know how to get rid of cockroaches forever since they’ve been here before us. But we do know we can get rid of these critters in our territory. With these natural ways to rid your home of roaches, you have several options to choose from. Apply all these natural ways to rid your home of roaches and we’ll be seeing none of these critters for good!

Which of these natural ways to rid your home of roaches have you tried or wish to try? Tell us about your thoughts in the comments section below!

Up Next: Beginner’s Guide To Having an Outdoor Herb Garden | Survival Gardening

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Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only. Please read our full disclaimer.

 

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on July 28, 2016, and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

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How to Remove a Splinter In 11 Natural and Painless Ways

How to Remove a Splinter In 11 Natural and Painless Ways


If you’re busy with outdoor and indoor activities or you spend most of your time in the woods, knowing how to remove a splinter can be very helpful for you. You’ll never know what will happen so being equipped with this knowledge will save you from trouble. Wood splinters, glass splinters, name it– these can be hard and painful to remove. Some people opt to use a tweezer, but it can be painful which will only make the situation worst. Here are 11 painless ways to get rid of a splinter you should try before grabbing a tweezer!

How to Remove a Splinter In 11 Natural and Painless Ways

 

1. Bacon Fat

bacon fat | How to Remove a Splinter

Cut a pea-sized piece of white fat from a raw strip of bacon and place directly onto the splinter. Secure the bacon fat with a bandage and leave it overnight. The bacon fat should draw out the splinter from your skin.

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2. Hydrogen Peroxide

removing a splinter with hydrogen peroxide | How to Remove a Splinter

A hydrogen peroxide can help remove the splinter effortlessly. Just soak a clean cotton pad in a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution then apply it on the affected area. The splinter should come out easily after a few minutes.

3. Onion

how to remove a splinter with onion | How to Remove a Splinter

Tape a fresh onion slice onto the splinter and leave overnight. The splinter will be drawn closer to the surface of your skin and will be easier to remove.

4. Epsom Salt

how to remove a splinter with epsom salt | How to Remove a Splinter

Epsom salt can help get rid of a splinter by increasing the osmotic pressure on the skin. All you need to do is dissolve 1 cup of Epsom salt in a tub of water then soak the affected area until the splinter gets drawn out. 

5. Wide Mouth Bottle and Hot Water

how to remove a splinter with a wide mouth bottle and hot water | Wide Mouth Bottle and Hot Water

Fill the bottle with hot water close to full. Place your hand with splinter over the mouth of the bottle until completely covered. Steam and suction caused by your hand should draw out the splinter from your skin.

6. Clear Nail Polish

how to remove a splinter with clear nail polish | Wide Mouth Bottle and Hot Water

Did you know that a nail polish can also be your companion in removing a splinter? To do this, apply a clear nail polish over the affected area and let it dry. Peel off the nail polish in the opposite direction of the splinter. The splinter should come out after one try.

7. Essential Oils

how to remove a splinter with essential oil | Essential Oils

Add a few drops of lavender or clove essential oil to the affected area. This allows the splintered skin to naturally swell. The splinter should come out right after a mild swell.

8. Castor Oil

how to remove a splinter with castor oil | Castor Oil

The use of a castor oil in removing a splinter is a widely practiced home remedy. If you accidentally got a splinter, apply an ample amount of pure castor oil into the affected area. Cover it with a bandage and leave it overnight. The castor oil will soften the skin making it easier to get rid of the splinter.

9. Tomato

how to remove a splinter with tomato | Tomato

Fresh tomatoes aren’t just used for cooking a delicious meal but also for removing a stubborn splinter. Apply a small piece of tomato directly onto the splinter. Put a band-aid to cover the tomato and leave it overnight. The tomato will move the splinter to the surface and it will be easier to pull out.

10. White Vinegar

Simply immerse the affected area in a bowl filled with white vinegar for about half an hour, then wait for the splinter to rise on the surface of your skin. Remove the splinter gently with your hand or with a tweezer.

11. Tape

For this way of splinter removal, you’ll need either a packaging tape or a duct tape. Gently cut a small piece of tape and tap it on the affected area while gently catching the splinter. Be sure to stick the splinter on the tape so you can easily pull it out. You can repeat the process if necessary. This is applicable only if the splinter is not too deep and close enough on the skin surface so the tape can be attached to it.

 

Watch this helpful video from Tech Insider’s channel for more ways on how to remove a splinter:

Now you know several ways on how to remove a splinter. Try these in case you or someone you know get stuck in an unexpected situation. You’ll find these ways very handy and convenient since you can easily find the things you need in your household. If you love making yourself busy and active, the last thing you want to do is remove a splinter in your foot or finger, so being cautious is still the best thing to do!

Do you have anything else to add to our list of ways on how to remove a splinter? Tell us about it in the comments section below!

Up Next: What to Include in a Home First Aid Kit

 

Editor’s Note – This article has been updated for accuracy and relevancy. Original publish date: February 8, 2016.

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5 Natural Tick Repellents to Get Rid of Ticks NOW

5 Natural Tick Repellents to Get Rid of Ticks NOW


How would you like to learn about natural tick repellents for you and your pets? If you’re like me, you consider your pets part of your family. Our pets give us companionship, comfort, and sometimes even help with certain tasks like hunting and herding that are essential for a survival or homestead lifestyle. It’s so important to protect your pets from parasites, which at best will make them itchy and uncomfortable, and at worst infect them with harmful and sometimes deadly diseases.

Natural Tick Repellents | Protect You and Your Pets From Ticks

 

 All Natural Tick Repellent for Humans

All Natural Tick Repellent for Humans | Natural Tick Repellents to Get Rid of Ticks NOW
Hiking in a densely wooded area can often lead to a tick infestation.

It’s so important to keep ticks under control, and the best way to do that is to prevent them from latching on in the first place. You should exercise extra caution when venturing into a moist or wooded environment, as these are the areas where ticks flourish. Just in case you do end up with a tick on you, you should learn how to remove a tick safely. But using these natural tick repellents below, you will make yourself much safer if you have something to repel ticks.

Recipe #1: Tick Repellent For Your Clothes

This insect repellent is applied to your clothes instead of your skin. It will stop fleas and ticks in their tracks before they even have a chance to latch on to you. As a bonus, you won’t have to worry about any sticky residue on your skin.

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Check out the recipe below and learn how to make your own tick spray.

What You’ll Need:

  • Spray bottle (for mixing water with essential oil)
  • 1 cup of water
  • 10 drops of rose geranium oil
  • 5 drops of cedarwood oil
  • 2 to 3 drops of lavender oil
  • 2 to 3 drops of lemongrass oil

Instructions:

  • Fill a spray bottle with 1 cup of water.
  • Add the essential oils and shake well.

To Apply:

Shake well before each use and spray it on your clothes and shoes. The scent caused by the active ingredients will keep ticks away and act as a natural insect repellent.

Recipe #2: Repellent for Your Clothes, Skin, and Hair

This all-natural tick repellent will work on any part of your body, clothes or hair. The peppermint oil also gives it a great aroma.

What You’ll Need:

  • Spray bottle
  • 2 cups of distilled white vinegar
  • 1 cup of water
  • 20 drops of peppermint oil

Instructions:

  • Fill a spray bottle with all the ingredients and shake well.
  • Spray this mixture onto your clothes, hair, and skin before going outdoors.

If you are going to be outside most of the day, reapply every 4 hours.

Recipe #3: Tick Repellent for Your Clothes

Here’s one more tick repellent you can apply to your clothes to keep those creepy crawlers off of you.

What you’ll need:

  • Spray bottle
  • 20 drops of rose geranium oil
  • 10 drops of sweetgrass oil
  • 5 drops of lavender oil
  • 5 drops of citronella or lemon oil
  • 4 oz of rubbing alcohol, witch hazel, vodka, apple cider vinegar, OR distilled water

Instructions: Add all of the ingredients into the spray bottle, shake well, and spray on clothes before going outside.

All Natural Tick Repellents for Your Pets

Summer is the worst time of year for flea and tick infestations, and our pets seem to be the ones who are affected the most. Ticks love to burrow under their hair and attach to the skin in dark, damp areas such as the elbows and groin. You should check your pets for ticks daily, especially after taking them for a walk, hike or swim. These natural tick repellents below will also help protect them from an infestation.

Recipe #1: Natural Tick Repellent for Dogs

Natural Tick Repellent for Dogs | Natural Tick Repellents to Get Rid of Ticks NOW

If you have outside dogs, it’s very important to keep them protected from fleas. But even if your pooch only goes outside for an hour or two a day, you’d be amazed how quickly ticks can latch on.

This natural tick repellent for dogs will keep Fido safe and tick-free.

What you’ll need:

  • Spray bottle
  • 1 cup of water
  • 2 cups of white distilled vinegar
  • 2 tsp of almond or vegetable oil

Instructions:

Spray the mixture on your pet’s dry coat. It is important to keep the repellent away from sensitive areas like nose, eyes, genitals, and mouth.

When your pet is outdoors for extended periods, you should spray the solution about 2-3 times every day. On the other hand, if your pet is only outdoors for potty breaks, you should spray the solution just once every day.

Tip: If you want to make a repellent that can also repel fleas, add 1 tsp of citrus oil, lemon juice, OR peppermint oil.

Recipe #2: Natural Tick Repellent for Cats

Natural Tick Repellent for Cats | Natural Tick Repellents to Get Rid of Ticks NOW

Most cats aren’t at as much of a risk for tick infestation due to spending most of their time inside. Still, it’s very important to protect them as well, since ticks can find their way inside from time to time. Obviously, if you have an outdoor cat, it’s even more important.

Here’s our recipe for natural tick repellent for cats.

What you’ll need:

  • 2 cups raw unfiltered organic apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp of dried organic neem leaf
  • 1 tbsp of dried organic catnip
  • a tbsp of dried organic lavender
  • 1 tbsp of dried organic peppermint leaf
  • 1 tbsp organic pure aloe vera gel (optional, but helps with skin and hair health)
  • Mason jar
  • Distilled water

Instructions:

  • Combine apple cider vinegar and herbs in a mason jar and steep for 1-2 weeks, shaking daily to combine. Strain with a cheesecloth or coffee filter before keeping in a glass mason jar for use.
  • In an 8 oz. spray bottle, combine 1/2 cup herbal infused apple cider vinegar, aloe vera gel, and distilled water to fill.
  • Spray onto cat while grooming.
  • Allow to dry completely and do not rinse off.

 

Aside from these natural tick repellents, there are other things you can do to avoid tick bites. Here are some additional tips.

How to Avoid Tick Bites

  • >Wear pantyhose underpants (yes, even guys too!)
  • Don’t walk in high grassy areas.
  • Keep your grass cut.
  • Don’t sit on logs – If you sit on a log for only five minutes, you raise your chance of getting bitten by 30%.
  • Wear hats when walking in the woods.
  • Wear tight (not loose) braids, ponytails or buns.
  • Put on clothing that covers the skin and has elastic on the wrist and ankles.
  • Wear boots or shoes that can be tightened at the ankles.
  • Tuck your pants into your socks.
  • Always walk in the center of trails when taking nature walks.
  • Shower within two hours of coming indoors. (I personally shower immediately after being outdoors. Showering immediately also helps to prevent chigger bites.)
  • Inspect your clothes and body, especially: under the arms, around the ears, inside the belly button, back of knees, and in your hair.

 

Watch this video by RealtreeOutdoors about making your own tick repellent:

Many ticks are found in wooded areas, tall grass, shrubs, and even in your lawn. Ticks like to hide in places that have significant moisture and areas that are out of direct sunlight. Avoid these areas to help prevent being bitten by ticks. Ticks can transfer bacteria and can cause diseases such as Lyme disease and tick-borne diseases. Protecting ourselves and our pets against these bloodsucking pests is a must. These natural solutions scare ticks away as well as serve as a mosquito repellent and bug repellent as well.
Do you have any tips of your own for how to avoid ticks? Share them with us and your fellow readers in the comments section!

Up Next: How to Remove Ticks from your Skin

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Editor’s Note – This post was originally published in August 2016 and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

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13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

13 Natural Remedies For Headaches


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Popping an aspirin or pain reliever rather than considering natural remedies for headaches seems to be the only solution that comes to mind for a lot of people. Most scoff at the thought of going through all the work just to come up with a remedy of natural origin.

13 Natural Remedies For Headaches: A Soothing Relief

Taking over-the-counter medication is a quick and less messy headache solution and may be less bothersome for those that experience them on a regular basis. However, whether we admit it or not, these synthetic solutions do have devastating side effects on our body. Most especially if taken without thought where dependency becomes an issue. For those who do want to take the natural course of getting rid of throbbing pain in their heads, here’s a list you might want to consider.

1. Apple Cider Vinegar Steam Treatment

Apple Cider Vinegar Steam Treatment | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Apple cider vinegar or ACV has been known to relieve a variety of ailments over the course of history. If you’re in doubt you can look it up on the web. You’ll need 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, 3 cups of boiling hot water, 1 glass of refreshing cold water, one large bowl or small basin, and a towel.

How To:

  • Pour the ACV into the bowl or basin
  • Pour in the hot water
  • Drape the towel over your head and lean over the bowl just close enough wherein the steam doesn’t burn your face
  • Breath in the steam during this whole process until there’s no more steam coming from the mixture
  • Pat your face dry with the towel when you’re one
  • Drink the glass of cold water

2. Sip A Hot Cup Of Gingerroot Tea

Sip A Hot Cup Of Gingerroot Tea | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

This herbaceous perennial is known not just as a spice but also a known folk medicine. Ginger is a natural home remedy for headaches. The ingredients are 3 slices of ginger about the size of a quarter and 2 cups of water.

How To: 

  • Heat the gingerroot in a pan with 2 cups of water for about 3o minutes
  • Remove the ginger before pouring it into a cup or a mug
  • Sip, breathe in the steam until your headache goes away

3. Sip Chamomile Tea

Sip Chamomile Tea | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches


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Chamomile has slight sedative elements and anti-inflammatory properties that aid in relieving migraines. Allow it to steep in hot water for 10 minutes and you can add honey if you want to make it have a sweet taste.

4. Drink 8 Glasses of Water Every Day

Drink 8 Glasses of Water Every Day | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

With the different kinds of drinks other than water made available in the market today, we tend to drink less water on a daily basis. Dehydration, or the lack of water in the system can result in a throbbing headache. Rehydrate and make sure you gulp in the required number glasses of water regularly.

5. Flaxseed

Flaxseed | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Flaxseed contains high concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids which can aid in reducing inflammation. If inflammation would be the cause of a headache that is. But you’ll never know, right? It can be taken in oil or ground form or added directly to your food or smoothie…even in a glass of water.

6. Thyme Or Rosemary Oil

Thyme Or Rosemary Oil | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Place a small amount of rosemary or thyme oil on your forehead and on your temples. Let it sit for a few minutes for it to relieve you of your aching head.

7. Lavender Oil

Lavender Oil | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Aromatherapy is what they call it. Just add a few drops of the lavender essential oil in boiling water, just like what we did with the ACV and inhale the vapors to get rid of headaches. If you don’t like to do that much work, you can apply it topically without having to water it down.

8. Peppermint Oil

Peppermint Oil | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Just like lavender oil, the scent provides a relaxing solution to your headache. The menthol content improves the blood of your blood vessels, most especially if they are clogged. There are different ways to do this:

  • Through aromatherapy in a dark and cool room
  • Steep 1 tsp of dried peppermint leaves in a cup of boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain it before adding honey for added flavor.
  • A solution of 1 Tbsp almond oil or water and 3 drops of peppermint oil. Apply topically on the back of the neck area or on your temples.

9. Massage

Massage | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Having a message on your shoulders, on your back and neck or on your temples can provide you with temporary relief.  This can be a series of massage sessions on a daily or weekly basis for a long-term relief.

10. Hot or Cold Compress

If you have a throbbing pain on your temple area, you can apply a cold compress over the area. Lowering the temperature can ease a bit of the throbbing. The hot compress should be applied to the back of the neck if you’re experiencing tightness of your neck muscles.

11. Drink A Cup Of Coffee

Drink A Cup Of Coffee | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Coffee lovers are definitely gonna love this! Caffeine in your coffee is said to reduce the swelling of your blood vessels. This in turn will reduce the severity of the pain and how often you experience a headache.

12. Soak Your Feet In Hot Water Mixed Mustard Powder

Soak Your Feet In Hot Water Mixed Mustard Powder | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

This will redirect blood from your upper body to your feet lowering the pressure in the blood vessels on your head. Soak your feet for at least 30 minutes.

 13. Constrict The Blood Vessels

Constrict The Blood Vessels | 13 Natural Remedies For Headaches

Tie a scarf or a bandana snuggly, just enough to feel the pressure, around your forehead area down to the base of your skull. You will reduce the blood flow to your head which will provide relief if your vessels are swollen.

Top 10 Home Remedies gives us her Top 3 home remedies for headaches:

Sometimes, the pill or medicine bottle is the quickest way get rid of that splitting pain on your head, however, many can say that taking the natural route is the best way to go. You get to enjoy a lot more benefits and make less havoc on other parts of your body or system compared to the synthetic process. So take your time, relax and do it the natural way.

Do you have any natural remedies for headaches that are not included in the list? Please add them in the comments below!

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