How To Build A Salt Water Distiller

How To Build A Salt Water Distiller


How would you like to make your own salt water distiller from the simplest materials? When you’re in the middle of nowhere and waiting for rescue to arrive, you always have to prepare for the worst possibilities to survive. Below, you’ll find out how survival desalination is done — using only very minimal resources and the sheer will to survive.

Salt Water Distiller | Make Your Own Improvised Version

 

 What You’ll Need:

  • 2 bottles of water
  • A pair of metal trays
  • Homemade rocket stove
  • Beach Sand

 

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Step 1: Set up the Metal Trays

Set up the metal trays | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

To start with your salt water purifier, position the metal trays in such a way that the two bottles rest mouth to mouth. Cut a notch on one side of both trays, so the neck of the bottles can sit a little lower in the pan. Suspend one of the bottles over a heat source. For example, here, a homemade rocket stove is shown.

Step 2: Fill the Trays with Sand

Fill the trays with sand | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

Secure the trays in place and fill them with sand. The sand will allow the trays to act more efficiently as the heat sinks. The first tray is for cooling one of the bottles, while the other tray evenly heats the other bottle, so it doesn’t shatter from too much heat on one side.

Step 3: Position the Bottles Evenly Mouth to Mouth

Position the bottles evenly mouth to mouth | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

Press the bottles firmly into the sand to give them good thermal contact and allow for evenly distributed heat. Make sure the bottles meet up as steadily as possible to prevent water vapor from escaping. Fill up one bottle with just enough volume of seawater so it doesn’t spill when turned sideways.

Step 4: Wet the Sand Surrounding the Receiving Bottle

Wet the sand surrounding the receiving bottle | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

As an additional measure to keep the cold half of this setup, wet the sand on the receiving bottle’s end to allow evaporative cooling to take place. You can cover the entire bottle with more wet sand or a wet towel as an alternative.

Step 5: Fire up the Heat Source

Fire up the heat source | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

It’s time to fire up the heat source. The quantity of sand on the tray may delay the water from reaching its boiling point immediately, but once the sand is heated enough, it stays hot for a long time. As the water boils dry, simply refill it to continue with the distillation process as long as you want.

You’re done! It’s time to taste your distilled water!

It's time to taste your distilled water! | How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide
Photo by NightHawkInLight / CC BY

There you have it! Now, you have your DIY water distiller. Now that you know how to remove salt from water without boiling, it’s time to test if your newly distilled water is good for hydration and no longer has a salty taste. You can do this desalination of seawater for drinking all over again until you have a large enough water supply to keep everyone hydrated in a survival situation.

 

Here’s the full video of this simple distillation process from NightHawkinLight:

For the purpose of this tutorial, the metal trays hold both bottles firmly in place. While you probably won’t have trays ready in a survival situation, you can substitute them with a pile of sand and bury one of the bottles at the very top of the pile with its mouth sticking out. Then, you can build your fire on top of the mound. As for the bottles, sadly, human trash has gone everywhere and plastic bottles usually wash up on beach shores, so they won’t be hard to find.

Have you tried making a simple salt water purifier? Share your experience in the comments section below!

Up Next: Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild

 

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are for informational purposes only. Please read our full disclaimer.

 

Editor’s Note – This post was originally published in September 2017 and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

 

How To Build A Salt Water Distiller | Survival Life Guide

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Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild

Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Knowing how to find and where to find water sources is one of the most crucial wilderness survival skills. Failure to find water has massive and compounding effects on both your physical and mental health. In fact, your body is in a constant state of losing water, regardless of the outside temperature. If you find yourself in a survival situation, finding water must be one of your top priorities. We’ve compiled a list of the 7 easiest and best places to find water. Looking for these sources is a skill you can add to your wilderness survival guide.

Wilderness Survival Skills | Water Sources Outdoors

 

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Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild

 

1. Rain

Rain | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Finding water to drink is one of the most basic survival skills one must learn. Rain is the quickest access to a clean water source. Unfortunately, it’s also unpredictable. It’s the simplest and safest water source outdoors because it has the lowest risk of bacterial infection. You can use bottles, cans, tarps and rain jackets to collect water.

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Boiling is always the best option for drinking any non-treated water source, but if you’re forced into a situation where it’s not an option, rainwater is the safest, untreated bet.

2. Rivers, Lakes, Streams

Rivers, Lakes, Streams | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Rivers, lakes, streams, or any other body of water will be one of the most obvious sources of water in the wild. Look for clear flowing water to ensure bacteria hasn’t built up. Follow game trails and look for flying birds in the early morning and early evening, as they will typically fly towards bodies of water. Lakes and streams are also a great spot to build a shelter outdoors.

While these may be the most common sources of water, they’re also the most susceptible to contamination. Never drink from these sources without filtering, treating, or boiling it first. With the right survival kit, you’ll be able to do what’s necessary to make the water from these sources safer to drink.

3. Morning Dew

Morning Dew | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


You can collect water from morning dew by tying a clean absorbent cloth or tufts of fine grass around your ankles and walk before sunrise through tall grass or meadows. Remember to avoid poisonous plants along the way. Avoid areas like farms or ranches which may be heavily treated with pesticides.

Collect the water from the cloth by squeezing it into a container. You’ll have to do this quite often if you want to collect enough water to last throughout the day. These primitive skills are a great option for areas where there’s not much rainfall.

4. Fruits and Vegetation

Fruits and Vegetation | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Fruits, vegetables, and plants contain lots of water. For example, coconut is such an excellent source of hydration, which is considered a survival food and Mother Nature’s Gatorade. You can use this method of collecting food for water when you’re trying to survive in a tropical environment.

It helps if you learn more about the edible plants and fruits around your area and know exactly how to prepare them for food consumption. Some plants, while full of water, can also cause massive intestinal issues.

5. Plant Transpiration

Plant Transpiration | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Transpiration happens when the moisture is carried from the plants’ roots to the underside of its leaves. Tying a plastic bag around a whole branch of leaves will trap water and let it fall into your collecting bag or canister. The trapped water vapor will then turn into moisture, thus giving you clean and crisp water. Again, be cautious and avoid collecting water from poisonous plants such as poison ivy, oak, or sumac. If you’re lucky, you may be able to spot some wild edibles nearby.

 

 

6. Digging a Solar Still

Digging A Solar Still | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Since there is moisture underground, digging your way to the water source is clever — but takes time. You can gather up to 5 liters of water per day using a still.

Here’s another basic survival skill for collecting water. Dig a hole measuring 3ft by 2ft, then dig a smaller hole where your canister can fit easily. Place the plastic and keep it in place with some rocks. After that, place a small rock or weight in the middle of the plastic to create an inverted cone over the container to collect water.

7. Tree Forks or Rock Crevices

Tree Forks or Rock Crevices | Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild


Tree forks or rock crevices in the woods might not be the most plentiful source of water, but they’re better than going without any water at all. The forks of tree limbs or rock crevices can collect a small amount of water due to their concave shape. Use clean clothing like a sock or bandana to soak the moisture or water in and wring it out.

 

Watch this video from WatchMojo.com for some more wilderness survival skills you need to know:

There are lots of wilderness survival skills to help you find a water source in the wild; you just have to know where to look. The ability to find water outdoors is an essential wilderness survival skills you need to master. After finding a water source, knowing how to purify the water you’ve collected is the second most important skill to have. Remember, you’re not the only one looking for water out there. Always boil or treat water when you get the chance! Never drink from an untrusted source — you never know what’s around the bend.

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Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild

What’s the most important wilderness survival skill for you? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

Up Next: 7 Native American Survival Skills

Check out Wilderness Survival Skills | 7 Unique Ways To Find Water In The Wild at https://survivallife.com/wilderness-survival-skills-find-water/

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Editor’s Note – This post was originally published on November 7, 2017, and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

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25 Ways to Get Clean Drinking Water in an Emergency

25 Ways to Get Clean Drinking Water in an Emergency


If you love the outdoors or you have gone on a trip in the wilderness you know how fast you could gulp down a bottle of water. It can be the intense heat of the sun beating down on you or you’re sweating profusely from all the rigorous activities that your body has been through. What if you run out of water in the middle of nowhere? You may come across a body of water but you’re not too sure about it being clean unless you’re an extreme survivalist. You wouldn’t want to end up with diarrhea or stomach problems, would you? Whether you’re outdoors or at home, being able to get clean drinking water in an emergency is vital to quench your thirst and survive.

The following list will show you’re a number of ways to get clean drinking water should you find yourself in a pinch.

  • Rainwater

    – This can be the most basic substitute next to having a direct source of potable drinking water. You can collect them in rain barrels attached to the downspouts from your roof. The need for straining, filtering and purifying is still needed prior to consumption.

  • Hot Seat

    – The tank of your toilet seat that has a removable lid, more often than not, can be a good source of drinkable clean water. Since it comes directly from your tap then it may be good to drink. However, that would depend on the age of your toilet.

  • Water Heater Tanks

    – You will not have to boil the water taken from these tanks as it has already done that for you. Just make sure you turn off the gas or electricity before unplugging the drain at the bottom of the tank.

  • The SODIS Way

    –  SODIS or solar ultraviolet water disinfection utilizes solar energy(UV-radiation) to purify water to rid it from diarrhea-causing pathogens and other harmful microorganisms. All you need is a clear water bottle or a plastic water bag, sunlight and a short waiting time.

  • Boiling It in a Pot

    – Pour the water through a coffee filter or a piece of cloth to rid it of visible debris and dirt. Heat up the water until it starts to boil. If you have a thermometer it is best that the water temperature reaches a boiling point of 212° F or 100° C to kill all pathogens.

  • Soil/Sand Filter

    – Without the latest technology water filters, one has to go back to the basics. Using a clean empty container, place a shirt or piece of cloth over it then fill it with sand or soil which will act as your filter. Other than removing sediments and particles, there is no assurance on the presence of bacteria.

  • Use a Solar Still

    – Just by digging a 3 feet deep hole into a ground, and using a wide plastic container you’ll be good to go. It may take some time but if you really don’t have any other option then waiting for your drink can be far off better than ingesting potentially harmful water.

  • Evaporation Distillation Method

    – You can even turn salt water into drinking water through different methods. It may require a bit more energy and more complex tools. However, it may be worth the wait especially if you’re located near the beach or floating aimlessly on a boat in the ocean.

  • Filtrating Through Moss

    – Moss absorbs moisture and can give you a quick sip if water can’t be found anywhere else. The web-like structure of moss also helps sift visible dirt and debris. But this doesn’t ensure the that the water you take out of moss is 100% purified.

  • DIY Pocket Water Filter

    – A small tube-like piece of material like bamboo can be used as your base. Fill it with moss, then charcoal, then moss again in respective order. Top it with the top end of a plastic bottle sealed with pine pitch will give you an instant water filter.

  • A DIY Water Filter

    – With the use of ordinary day to day items such as a  gallon bucket and a little bit of patience you can have your own filtration system when out in the wild. Adding bleach or chlorine will give you safe drinking water to end your hydration worries.

  • Purify a la Pool Shock

    – Also known as Calcium Hypochlorite which can be a substitute for bleach in purifying water. It has a very long shelf life, occupies very little space for storage, very cheap and most of all is readily available almost everywhere.

  • Fire It Up System

    – With the use of 2 metals drum, a sheet of metal sheet and a fire you can get distilled water for drinking. Place a fire at the bottom of the drum with bad water then arrange the metal sheet in a curve-like manner in an angle where it will drip steam into the catch drum.

  • Bleach Your Way Out Of It

    – You can disinfect a gallon of water with just 16 drops of chlorine bleach or a quarter with just 4 drops. This does not substitute the boiling method though. Don’t forget to filter the water from sediments and debris.

  • Through Hydrogen Peroxide Purification

    – This household ingredient has that capacity to purify water like that of chlorine and bleach. You will have to treat the water with twice the amount than that of chlorine or bleach. Shake or stir then let it sit for half an hour. There should be a slight peroxide odor after that. Otherwise, it may not have done a significant purification effect.

  • Iodine Tablets

    – Filtering the water from sediments is still needed since all that these little wonders can do is purify your water. 1 small tablet can purify up to a liter of water. Drop it in, give it a little shake and let it stand for 30 minutes before drinking.

  • Potassium Permanganate Purification

    – KMNO4 or more commonly called Condy’s crystals is a water softener that is sold in pill or powder form. 1g or 3 to 4 crystals can purify a liter of water.

  • Combo System

    – A combination of all the basic ways to get clean water would ensure it is indeed safe to drink. Filtering, distilling, chlorinating/disinfecting water from different water sources will give you peace of mind that you’re drinking safe water.

  • Hydration Backpack System

    – You can fill the Geigerrig pack with water taken from lakes, rivers, creeks, and streams to name a few and then attach the filter. You’ll be drinking clean drinking water even on the go in no time.

  • The Berkey Light Purification Device

    – This lightweight, shatter-resistant purifier needs no electricity and is capable of filtering 4 to 8 gallons of the murkiest water. Getting clean water has never been this safe because it’s more than “just another water filter…”

  • Sucking It Up System

    – You will have to embrace the suck on this one as you will surely be sucking it up since your life will surely depend on it. All it takes for you is to pop, dip and suck then you’re good to go. This little compact tool is called the Lifestraw and it weighs only about 2 oz. you will not have to worry about a worry about bringing a bottle anymore.

  • SteriPEN It

    – This revolutionary handheld water purifier is tested and certified by the WQA against US EPA Microbiological Water Purifier Standard. It uses UV light to make your water safe to drink. You will have to filter the water from dirt and debris though as it just sterilizes your water.

  • Sweetwater Purifier System

    – With an easy-to-use lever action pump handle that can provide 1 Liter of drinkable water per minute. This system weighs only 14 oz. and can be easily stored and pack in your bag.

  • Katadyn Water Filtration System

    – This mini filter can produce one to two quarts per minute depending on the mode applied. Depending on the quality of the water source the cartridge can give up to 500 gallons of water.

  • DIY Water Storage

    – Preparation for long-term is also a must. Carefully clean containers to be used for water storage, sanitize and label according to date filled, store in a cool dark place and then rotate container every six months to a year.

  • There are a lot of other ways or methods as well as tools and equipment that one can put into good use to get clean drinking water in the event of an emergency. Making sure of the unsure should the situation call for it is the most basic survival tool that any survivalist must utilize.  You are sure to survive longer or even get through an emergency situation if you master the basic techniques above.





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